Planet Linux Plumbers Conf

June 03, 2009

Darrick Wong

Picspam!

/me rounded up a bunch of (old) panoramas and put them into the high-definition panorama viewer. Be sure to check out the (huge spike in memory cache when you load the) panorama previewer (click the "See All" button).

June 03, 2009 02:27 AM

August 27, 2008

Stephen Hemminger

Exploring transactional filesystems

In order to implement router style semantics, Vyatta allows setting many different configuration variables and then applying them all at once with a commit command. Currently, this is implemented by a combination of shell magic and unionfs. The problem is that keeping unionfs up to date and fixing the resulting crashes is major pain.

There must be better alternatives, current options include:
  • Replace unionfs with aufs which has less users yelling at it and more developers.
  • Use a filesystem like btrfs which has snapshots. This changes the model and makes api's like "what changed?" hard to implement.
  • Move to a pure userspace model using git. The problem here is that git as currently written is meant for users not transactions.
  • Use combination of copy, bind mount, and rsync.
  • Use a database for configuration. This is easier for general queries but is the most work. Conversion from existing format would be a pain.
Looks like a fun/hard problem. Don't expect any resolution soon.

by Linux Network Plumber (noreply@blogger.com) at August 27, 2008 10:20 PM

August 07, 2017

Paul E. McKenney

Book review: "Antifragile: Things That Gain From Disorder"

This is the fourth and final book in Nassim Taleb's Incerto series, which makes a case for antifragility as a key component of design, taking the art of design one step beyond robustness. An antifragile system is one where variation, chaos, stress, and errors improve the results. For example, within limits, stressing muscles and bones makes them stronger. In contrast, stressing a device made of (say) aluminum will eventually cause it to fail. Taleb gives a lengthy list of examples in Table 1 starting on page 23, some of which seem more plausible than others. An example implausible entry lists rule-based systems as fragile, principles-based systems as robust, and virtue-based systems as antifragile. Although I can imagine a viewpoint where this makes sense, any expectation that a significantly large swath of present-day society will agree on a set of principles (never mind virtues!) seems insanely optimistic. The table nevertheless provides much good food for thought.

Taleb states that he has constructed antifragile financial strategies using insurance to control downside risks. But he also states on page 6 “Thou shalt not have antifragility at the expense of the fragility of others.” Perhaps Taleb figures that few will shed tears for any difficulties that insurance companies might get into, perhaps he is taking out policies that are too small to have material effect on the insurance company in question, or perhaps his policies are counter to the insurance company's main business, so that payouts to Taleb are anticorrelated with payouts to the company's other customers. One presumes that he has thought this through carefully, because a bankrupt insurance company might not be all that effective at controlling his downside risks.

Appendix I beginning on page 435 gives a graphical summary of the books main messages. Figure 28 on page 441 is good grist for the mills of those who would like humanity to become an intergalactic species: After all, confining the human race seems likely to limit its upside. (One counterargument would posit that a finite object might have unbounded value, but such counterarguments typically rely on there being a very large number of human beings interested in that finite object, which some would consider to counter this counterargument.)

The right-hand portion of Figure 30 on page 442 illustrates what the author calls local antifragility and global fragility. To see this, imagine that the x-axis represents variation from nominal conditions, and the y-axis represents payoff, with large positive payoffs being highly desired. The right-hand portion shows something not unrelated to the function x^2-x^4, which gives higher payoffs as you move in either direction from x=0, peaking when x reaches one divided by the square root of two (either positive or negative), dropping back to zero when x reaches +1 or -1, and dropping like a rock as one ventures further away from x=0. The author states that this local antifragility and global fragility is the most dangerous of all, but given that he repeatedly stresses that antifragile systems are antifragile only up to a point, this dangerous situation would seem to be the common case. Those of us who believe that life is inherently dangerous should have no problem with this apparent contradiction.

But what does all of this have to do with parallel programming???

Well, how about “Is RCU antifragile?”

One case for RCU antifragility is the batching optimizations that allow many (as in thousands) concurrent requests to share the same grace-period computation. Therefore, the heavier the update-side load on RCU, the more efficiently RCU operates.

However, load is but one of many aspects of RCU's environment that might be varied. For an extreme example, RCU is exceedingly fragile with respect to small perturbations of the program counter, as Peter Sewell so ably demonstrated, by running emacs, no less. RCU is also fragile with respect to timekeeping anomalies, for example, it can emit false-positive RCU CPU stall warnings if different CPUs have tens-of-seconds disagreements as to the current time. However, the aforementioned bones and muscles are similarly fragile with respect to any number of chemical substances (AKA “poisons”), to say nothing of well-known natural phenomena such as lightning bolts and landslides.

Even when excluding hardware misbehavior such as auto-perturbing program counters and unsynchronized clocks, RCU would still be subject to software aging, and RCU has in fact require multiple interventions from its developers and maintainer in order to keep up with changing hardware, workload, and usage. One could therefore argue that RCU is fragile with respect to perturbations of time, although the combination of RCU and its developers, reviewers, and maintainer seem to have kept up reasonably well thus far.

On the other hand, perhaps it is unrealistic to evaluate the antifragility of software without including black-hat hackers. Achieving antifragility in that sort of environment is still very much a grand challenge problem, but a challenge that must be faced. Oh, you think RCU is to low-level for this sort of attack? There was a time when I thought so. And then came rowhammer.

So please be careful, and, where possible, antifragile! It is after all a real world out there!!!

August 07, 2017 04:36 AM

July 20, 2017

Paul E. McKenney

Parallel Programming: Getting the English text out of the way

We have been making good progress on the next release of Is Parallel Programming Hard, And, If So, What Can You Do About It?, and hope to have a new release out soonish.

In the meantime, for those of you for whom the English text in this book has simply gotten in the way, there is now an alternative:

perfbook_cn_cover

On the off-chance that any of you are seriously interested, this is available from
Amazon China, JD.com, Taobao.com, and Dangdang.com. For the rest of you, you have at least seen the picture.  ;–)

July 20, 2017 02:37 AM

September 22, 2016

Sri Ramkrishna

Making money from copylefted code

I wanted to put this out there while I still have it fresh in my mind. Here at the copyleft BoF with Bradlely Kuhn at LAS GNOME. One of the biggest take away from this is something that Bryan Lunduke said that people are able to make money off from copyleft if we don’t actually brand it as free and open source software. So it seems that if we don’t advertise something as free or open source or that there is software available, then there is a decent chance that you can make money.

Which goes back to the interesting conversation we had the previous day on pretty much the same topic. Just fascinating stuff.

by sri at September 22, 2016 06:04 PM

September 20, 2016

Sri Ramkrishna

We’re going to partay, karamu, fiesta, forever

GNOME release 3.22 happens to be during one of the core days of the Libre Application Summit Hosted by GNOME (LAS GNOME) On top of a high rise, in Portland Oregon, we’re going to celebrate GNOME 3.22 in grand style with the conference participants and end the core days at LAS GNOME!

by sri at September 20, 2016 12:05 AM

September 06, 2016

Greg KH

4.9 == next LTS kernel

As I briefly mentioned a few weeks ago on my G+ page, the plan is for the 4.9 Linux kernel release to be the next “Long Term Supported” (LTS) kernel.

Last year, at the Linux Kernel Summit, we discussed just how to pick the LTS kernel. Many years ago, we tried to let everyone know ahead of time what the kernel version would be, but that caused a lot of problems as people threw crud in there that really wasn’t ready to be merged, just to make it easier for their “day job”. That was many years ago, and people insist they aren’t going to do this again, so let’s see what happens.

I reserve the right to not pick 4.9 and support it for two years, if it’s a major pain because people abused this notice. If so, I’ll possibly drop back to 4.8, or just wait for 4.10 to be released. I’ll let everyone know by updating the kernel.org releases page when it’s time (many months from now.)

If people have questions about this, email me and I will be glad to discuss it.

September 06, 2016 07:59 AM

April 06, 2009

Darrick Wong

January 15, 2014

Greg KH

kdbus details

Now that linux.conf.au is over, there has been a bunch of information running around about the status of kdbus and the integration of it with systemd. So, here’s a short summary of what’s going on at the moment.

Lennart Poettering gave a talk about kdbus at linux.conf.au. The talk can be viewed here, and the slides are here. Go read the slides and watch the talk, odds are, most of your questions will be answered there already.

For those who don’t want to take the time watching the talk, lwn.net wrote up a great summary of the talk, and that article is here. For those of you without a lwn.net subscription, what are you waiting for? You’ll have to wait two weeks before it comes out from behind the paid section of the website before reading it, sorry.

There will be a systemd hack-fest a few days before FOSDEM, where we should hopefully pound out the remaining rough edges on the codebase and get it ready to be merged. Lennart will also be giving his kdbus talk again at FOSDEM if anyone wants to see it in person.

The kdbus code can be found in two places, both on google code, and on github, depending on where you like to browse things. In a few weeks we’ll probably be creating some patches and submitting it for inclusion in the main kernel, but more testing with the latest systemd code needs to be done first.

If you want more information about the kdbus interface, and how it works, please see the kdbus.txt file for details.

Binder vs. kdbus

A lot of people have asked about replacing Android’s binder code with kdbus. I originally thought this could be done, but as time has gone by, I’ve come to the conclusion that this will not happen with the first version of kdbus, and possibly can never happen.

First off, go read that link describing binder that I pointed to above, especially all of the links to different resources from that page. That should give you more than you ever wanted to know about binder.

Short answer

Binder is bound to the CPU, D-Bus (and hence kdbus), is bound to RAM.

Long answer

Binder

Binder is an interface that Android uses to provide synchronous calling (CPU) from one task to a thread of another task. There is no queueing involved in these calls, other than the caller process is suspended until the answering process returns. RAM is not interesting besides the fact that it is used to share the data between the different callers. The fact that the caller process gives up its CPU slice to the answering process is key for how Android works with the binder library.

This is just like a syscall, and it behaves a lot like a mutex. The communicating processes are directly connected to each other. There is an upper limit of how many different processes can be using binder at once, and I think it’s around 16 for most systems.

D-Bus

D-Bus is asynchronous, it queues (RAM) messages, keeps the messages in order, and the receiver dequeues the messages. The CPU does not matter at all other than it is used to do the asynchronous work of passing the RAM around between the different processes.

This is a lot like network communication protocols. It is a very “disconnected” communication method between processes. The upper limit of message sizes and numbers is usually around 8Mb per connection and a normal message is around 200-800 bytes.

Binder

The model of Binder was created for a microkernel-like device (side note, go read this wonderful article about the history of Danger written by one of the engineers at that company for a glimpse into where the Android internals came from, binder included.) The model of binder is very limited, inflexible in its use-cases, but very powerful and extremely low-overhead and fast. Binder ensures that the same CPU timeslice will go from the calling process into the called process’s thread, and then come back into the caller when finished. There is almost no scheduling involved, and is much like a syscall into the kernel that does work for the calling process. This interface is very well suited for cheap devices with almost no RAM and very low CPU resources.

So, for systems like Android, binder makes total sense, especially given the history of it and where it was designed to be used.

D-Bus

D-Bus is a create-store-forward, compose reply and then create-store-forward messaging model which is more complex than binder, but because of that, it is extremely flexible, versatile, network transparent, much easier to manage, and very easy to let fully untrusted peers take part of the communication model (hint, never let this happen with binder, or bad things will happen…) D-Bus can scale up to huge amounts of data, and with the implementation of kdbus it is possible to pass gigabytes of buffers to every connection on the bus if you really wanted to. CPU-wise, it is not as efficient as binder, but is a much better general-purpose solution for general-purpose machines and workloads.

CPU vs. RAM

Yes, it’s an over simplification of a different set of complex IPC methods, but these 3 words should help you explain the differences between binder and D-Bus and why kdbus isn’t going to be able to easily replace binder anytime soon.

Never say never

Ok, before you start to object to the above statements, yes, we could add functionality to kdbus to have some blocking ioctl calls that implement something like: write question -> block for reply and read reply one answer for the request side, and then on the server side do: write answer -> block in read That would get kdbus a tiny bit closer to the binder model, by queueing stuff in RAM instead of relying on a thread pool.

That might work, but would require a lot of work on the binder library side in Android, and as a very limited number of people have write access to that code (they all can be counted on one hand), and it’s a non-trivial amount of work for a core function of Android that is working very well today, I don’t know if it will ever happen.

But anything is possible, it’s just software you know…

Thanks

Many thanks to Kay Sievers who came up with the CPU vs. RAM description of binder and D-Bus and whose email I pretty much just copied into this post. Also thanks to Kay and Lennart for taking the time and energy to put up with my silly statements about how kdbus could replace binder, and totally proving me wrong, sorry for having you spend so much time on this, but I now know you are right.

Also thanks to Daniel Mack and Kay for doing so much work on the kdbus kernel code, that I don’t think any of my original implementation is even present anymore, which is probably a good thing. Also thanks to Tejun Heo for help with the memfd implementation and cgroups help in kdbus.

January 15, 2014 08:57 PM

September 03, 2009

Valerie Aurora

Carbon METRIC BUTTLOAD print

I just read Charlie Stross's rant on reducing his household's carbon footprint. Summary: He and his wife can live a life of monastic discomfort, wearing moldy scratchy 10-year-old bamboo fiber jumpsuits and shivering in their flat - or, they can cut out one transatlantic flight per year and achieve the equivalent carbon footprint reduction.

I did a similar analysis back around 2007 or so and had the same result: I've got a relatively trim carbon footprint compared to your average first-worlder, except for the air travel that turns it into a bloated planet-eating monster too extreme to fall under the delicate term "footprint." Like Charlie, I am too practical, too technophilic, and too hopeful to accept that the only hope of saving the planet is to regress to third world living standards (fucking eco-ascetics!). I decided that I would only make changes that made my life better, not worse - e.g., living in a walkable urban center (downtown Portland, now SF). But the air travel was a stumper. I liked traveling, and flying around the world for conferences is a vital component of saving the world through open source. Isn't it? Isn't it?

Two things happened that made me re-evaluate my air travel philosophy. One, I started a file systems consulting business and didn't have a lot of spare cash to spend on fripperies. Two, I hurt my back and sitting became massively uncomfortable (still recovering from that one). So I cut down on the flying around the world to Linux conferences involuntarily.

You know what I discovered? I LOVE not flying around the world for Linux conferences. I love taking only a few flights a year. I love flying mostly in the same time zone (yay, West coast). I love having the energy to travel for fun because I'm not all dragged out by the conference circuit. I love hanging out with my friends who live in the same city instead of missing out on all the parties because I'm in fucking Venezuela instead.

Save the planet. Burn your frequent flyer card.

September 03, 2009 07:04 AM

March 04, 2013

Twitter

March 01, 2013

Twitter

February 18, 2009

Stephen Hemminger

Parallelizing netfilter

The Linux networking receive performance has been mostly single threaded until the advent of MSI-X and multiqueue receive hardware. Now with many cards, it is possible to be processing packets on multiple CPU's and cores at once. All this is great, and improves performance for the simple case.

But most users don't just use simple networking. They use useful features like netfilter to do firewalling, NAT, connection tracking and all other forms of wierd and wonderful things. The netfilter code has been tuned over the years, but there are still several hot locks in the receive path. Most of these are reader-writer locks which are actually the worst kind, much worse than a simple spin lock. The problem with locks on modern CPU's is that even for the uncontested case, a lock operation means a full-stop cache miss.

With the help of Eric Duzmet, Rick Jones, Martin Josefsson and others, it looks like there is a solution to most of these. I am excited to see how it all pans out but it could mean a big performance increase for any kind of netfilter packet intensive processing. Stay tuned.

by Linux Network Plumber (noreply@blogger.com) at February 18, 2009 05:51 AM

September 25, 2010

Andy Grover

Plumbers Down Under

<p>Since the original <a href="http://www.linuxplumbersconf.org/">Linux Plumbers Conference</a> drew much inspiration from <a href="http://lca2011.linux.org.au/">LCA</a>'s continuing success, it's cool to see some of what Plumbers has done be seen as <a href="http://airlied.livejournal.com/73491.html">worthy of emulating at next year's LCA</a>!</p><p>LCA seems like a great opportunity to specifically try to make progress on cross-project issues. It's quite well-attended so it's likely the people you need in the room to make a decision will be <em>in the room</em>.</p>

by andy.grover at September 25, 2010 01:50 PM

September 10, 2010

Andy Grover

Increasing office presence for remote workers

<p>I work from home. My basement, actually. I recently read an article in the Times about <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/05/science/05robots.html?_r=1&amp;pagewanted=1">increasing the office presence of remote employees with robots</a>. Pretty interesting. How much does one of those robo-Beltzners cost? $5k? This is a neat idea but it's still not released so who knows.<br /><br />I've been thinking about other options for establishing a stronger office presence for myself. Recently I bought a webcam. If I used this to broadcast me, sitting at my desk on Ustream or Livestream, that would certainly make it so my coworkers (and the rest of the world) could see what I was up to, every second of the workday. This is actually a lot <i>more</i> exposure than an office worker, even in a cubicle, would expect. If I'm in an office cube, I might have people stop by, but I'll know they're there, and they won't <i>always</i> be there.&nbsp; There is still generally solitude and privacy to concentrate on the code and be productive. I'm currently trying something that I think is closer to the balance of a real office:<br /><ul><li>Take snapshots from webcam every 15 minutes<br /></li><li>Only during normal working hours</li><li>Give 3 second audible warning before capturing</li><li>Upload to an intranet webserver</li></ul>I haven't found this to be too much of an imposition -- in fact, the quarter-hourly beeps are somewhat like a clock chime.<br /><br />In the beginning, it's hard to resist mugging for the camera, but that passes:<br /><img style="max-width: 800px;" src="http://oss.oracle.com/%7Eagrover/pics/blog/whassup.jpg" alt="whassup???" height="240" width="320" /><br />Think about how this is better than irc or IM, both of which <i>do</i> have activity/presence indicators, but which either aren't used, or poorly implemented and often wrong. How much more likely are you, as a colleague of mine, to IM, email, video chat, or call me if you can see I'm at my desk and working? No more "around?" messages needed. You could even see if I'm looking cheerful, or perhaps otherwise indisposed, heh heh:<br /><img style="max-width: 800px;" src="http://oss.oracle.com/%7Eagrover/pics/blog/cat1.jpg" alt="hello kitty" height="240" width="320" /><br />On a technical note, although there were many Debian packages that kind-of did what I wanted, it turned out to be surprisingly easy to roll my own in about <a href="http://github.com/agrover/pysnapper/blob/master/webcam.py">20 lines of Python</a>.<br /><img style="max-width: 800px;" src="http://oss.oracle.com/%7Eagrover/pics/blog/working.jpg" alt="working hard." height="240" width="320" /><br />Anyways, just something I've been playing around with, while I wait for my robo-avatar to be set up down at HQ...</p>

by andy.grover at September 10, 2010 05:20 PM

November 08, 2009

Valerie Aurora

Migrated to WordPress

My LiveJournal blog name - valhenson - was the last major holdover from my old name, Val Henson. I got a new Social Security card, passport, and driver's license with my new name several months ago, but migrating my blog? That's hard! Or something. I finally got around to moving to a brand-spanking-new blog at WordPress:

Valerie Aurora's blog

Update your RSS reader with the above if you still want to read my blog - I won't be republishing my posts to my new blog on this LiveJournal blog.

If you're aware of any other current instances of "Val Henson" or "Valerie Henson," let me know! I obviously can't change my name on historical documents, like research papers or interviews, but if it's vaguely real-time-ish, I'd like to update it.

One web page I'm going to keep as Val Henson for historical reasons is my Val Henson is a Man joke. Several of the pages on my web site were created after the fact as vehicles for amusing pictures or graphics I had lying around. In this case, my friend Dana Sibera created a pretty damn cool picture of me with a full beard and I had to do something with it.



It's doubly wild now that I have such short hair.

November 08, 2009 11:36 PM