Planet Linux Plumbers Conf

June 03, 2009

Darrick Wong

Picspam!

/me rounded up a bunch of (old) panoramas and put them into the high-definition panorama viewer. Be sure to check out the (huge spike in memory cache when you load the) panorama previewer (click the "See All" button).

June 03, 2009 02:27 AM

August 27, 2008

Stephen Hemminger

Exploring transactional filesystems

In order to implement router style semantics, Vyatta allows setting many different configuration variables and then applying them all at once with a commit command. Currently, this is implemented by a combination of shell magic and unionfs. The problem is that keeping unionfs up to date and fixing the resulting crashes is major pain.

There must be better alternatives, current options include:
  • Replace unionfs with aufs which has less users yelling at it and more developers.
  • Use a filesystem like btrfs which has snapshots. This changes the model and makes api's like "what changed?" hard to implement.
  • Move to a pure userspace model using git. The problem here is that git as currently written is meant for users not transactions.
  • Use combination of copy, bind mount, and rsync.
  • Use a database for configuration. This is easier for general queries but is the most work. Conversion from existing format would be a pain.
Looks like a fun/hard problem. Don't expect any resolution soon.

by Linux Network Plumber (noreply@blogger.com) at August 27, 2008 10:20 PM

May 30, 2018

Paul E. McKenney

Call For Participation in 2018 Linux Plumbers Conference!

Referred-track, microconference, and BoF proposals all welcome, see below!

Submissions close: September 2, 2018
Speakers notified: September 23, 2018
Slides due: November 9, 2018

Microconference slots often fill before the deadline (so don't wait to submit yours!) but BoF submissions can come late.

Call for Refereed-Track Proposals

We are pleased to announce the Call for Refereed-Track Proposals for the 2018 edition of the Linux Plumbers Conference, which will held be in Vancouver, BC, Canada on November 13-15 in conjunction with the Linux Kernel Summit.

Refereed track presentations are 50 minutes in length (which includes time for questions and discussion) and should focus on a specific aspect of the "plumbing" in the Linux system. Examples of Linux plumbing include core kernel subsystems, toolchains, container runtimes, core libraries, windowing systems, management tools, device support, media creation/playback, and so on. The best presentations are not about finished work, but rather problems, proposals, or proof-of-concept solutions that require face-to-face discussions and debate.

Given that Plumbers is not colocated with Open Source Summit this year, we are spreading the refereed-track talks over all three days. This provides a change of pace and also provides a conflict-free schedule for the refereed-track talks. (Yes, this does result in more conflicts between the refereed-track talks and the Microconferences, but we never claimed that the world was perfect.)

Linux Plumbers Conference Program Committee members will be reviewing all submitted sessions. High-quality submisssion that cannot be accepted due to the limited number of slots will be forwarded to the Microconference leads for further consideration. We also encourage submitters to consider BoF sessions and the unconference.

To submit a refereed track talk proposal follow the instructions at this website.

Please note that we have a completely different submission system than last year, so please do not let your muscle memory take over.

Submissions are due on or before Friday September 2, 2018 at noon Mountain Time. Since this is after the closure of early registration, speakers may register before this date and we'll refund the registration for any selected presentation's speaker, but for only one speaker per presentation.

Call for Microconference Proposals

We are pleased to announce the Call for Microconferences for the 2018 edition of the Linux Plumbers Conference, which will be held in Vancouver BC, Canada on November 13-15 in conjunction with the Linux Kernel Summit.

A microconference is a collection of collaborative sessions focused on problems in a particular area of the Linux plumbing, which includes the kernel, libraries, utilities, UI, and so forth, but can also focus on cross-cutting concerns such as security, scaling, energy efficiency, toolchains, container runtimes, or a particular use case. Good microconferences result in solutions to these problems and concerns, while the best microconferences result in patches that implement those solutions. For more information on submitting a microconference proposal, see this website.

Again, please note that we have a completely different submission system than last year, so please do not let your muscle memory take over. In particular, unlike last year, there is no wiki. So instead of creating an entry for you microconference on a wiki, you submit it using the above URL.

Call for Bird of a Feather (BoF) Session Proposals

Last, but by no means least, we are also pleased to announce a call for BoF sessions. These are free-form get-togethers for people wishing to discuss a particular topic. As always, you only need to submit proposals for BoFs you want to hold on-site. In contrast, and again as always, informal BoFs may be held at local drinking establishments or in the “hallway track” at your convenience.

May 30, 2018 07:32 PM

April 03, 2018

Paul E. McKenney

A Linux-kernel memory model!

A big “thank you” to all my partners in LKMM crime, most especially to Jade, Luc, Andrea, and Alan! Jade presented our paper (slides, supplementary material) at ASPLOS, which was well-received. A number of people asked how they could learn more about LKMM, which is what much of this blog post is about.

Approaches to learning LKMM include:

  1. Read the documentation, starting with explanation.txt. This documentation replaces most of the older LWN series.
  2. Go through Ted Cooper's coursework for Portland State University's CS510 Advanced Topics in Concurrency class, taught by Jon Walpole.
  3. Those interested in the history of LKMM might wish to look at my 2017 linux.conf.au presentation (video).
  4. Play with the actual model.
The first three options are straightforward, but playing with the model requires some installation. However, playing with the model is probably key to gaining a full understanding of LKMM, so this installation step is well worth the effort.

Installation instructions may be found here (see the “REQUIREMENTS” section). The ocaml language is a prerequisite, which is fortunately included in many Linux distros. If you choose to install ocaml from source (for example, because you need a more recent version), do yourself a favor and read the instructions completely before starting the build process! Otherwise, you will find yourself learning of the convenient one-step build process only after carrying out the laborious five-step process, which can be a bit frustrating.

Of course, if you come across better methods to quickly, easily, and thoroughly learn LKMM, please do not keep them a secret!

Those wanting a few rules of thumb safely approximating LKMM should look at slide 96 (PDF page 78) of the aforementioned linux.conf.au presentation. Please note that material earlier in the presentation is required to make sense of the three rules of thumb.

We also got some excellent questions during Jade's ASPLOS talk, mainly from the renowned and irrepressible Sarita Adve:

  • Question: How do we know that the model is correct?
    Answer: We verified the model socially and experimentally. [ Ed. note: See Section 1 and Table 5 of the paper and the “Detailed hardware results” from the supplementary materials. ]
  • Question: What is the intuition behind the model?
    Answer: There are a number of axioms, for example, the RCU axiom, that correspond to various intuitions. Additional axioms correspond to the load buffering and store buffering intuitions.
  • Question: How did you decide what to provide? For example, what about one of Paul's favorite primitives, sequence locking?
    Answer: The paper shows memory barrier, loads and stores, acquire and release, and read-modify-write atomic operations. We have since added locking, which in combination with some of the other operations allows sequence locking to be easily implemented within litmus tests. [ Ed. note: Not sure that sequence locking makes my list of favorites, but we do have a pair of sequence-locking litmus tests in preparation. ]
There were of course a great many other excellent presentations at ASPLOS, but that is a topic for another post!

April 03, 2018 06:35 PM

March 11, 2018

Greg KH

My affidavit in the Geniatech vs. McHardy case

As many people know, last week there was a court hearing in the Geniatech vs. McHardy case. This was a case brought claiming a license violation of the Linux kernel in Geniatech devices in the German court of OLG Cologne.

Harald Welte has written up a wonderful summary of the hearing, I strongly recommend that everyone go read that first.

In Harald’s summary, he refers to an affidavit that I provided to the court. Because the case was withdrawn by McHardy, my affidavit was not entered into the public record. I had always assumed that my affidavit would be made public, and since I have had a number of people ask me about what it contained, I figured it was good to just publish it for everyone to be able to see it.

There are some minor edits from what was exactly submitted to the court such as the side-by-side German translation of the English text, and some reformatting around some footnotes in the text, because I don’t know how to do that directly here, and they really were not all that relevant for anyone who reads this blog. Exhibit A is also not reproduced as it’s just a huge list of all of the kernel releases in which I felt that were no evidence of any contribution by Patrick McHardy.

AFFIDAVIT

I, the undersigned, Greg Kroah-Hartman,
declare in lieu of an oath and in the
knowledge that a wrong declaration in
lieu of an oath is punishable, to be
submitted before the Court:

I. With regard to me personally:

1. I have been an active contributor to
   the Linux Kernel since 1999.

2. Since February 1, 2012 I have been a
   Linux Foundation Fellow.  I am currently
   one of five Linux Foundation Fellows
   devoted to full time maintenance and
   advancement of Linux. In particular, I am
   the current Linux stable Kernel maintainer
   and manage the stable Kernel releases. I
   am also the maintainer for a variety of
   different subsystems that include USB,
   staging, driver core, tty, and sysfs,
   among others.

3. I have been a member of the Linux
   Technical Advisory Board since 2005.

4. I have authored two books on Linux Kernel
   development including Linux Kernel in a
   Nutshell (2006) and Linux Device Drivers
   (co-authored Third Edition in 2009.)

5. I have been a contributing editor to Linux
   Journal from 2003 - 2006.

6. I am a co-author of every Linux Kernel
   Development Report. The first report was
   based on my Ottawa Linux Symposium keynote
   in 2006, and the report has been published
   every few years since then. I have been
   one of the co-author on all of them. This
   report includes a periodic in-depth
   analysis of who is currently contributing
   to Linux. Because of this work, I have an
   in-depth knowledge of the various records
   of contributions that have been maintained
   over the course of the Linux Kernel
   project.

   For many years, Linus Torvalds compiled a
   list of contributors to the Linux kernel
   with each release. There are also usenet
   and email records of contributions made
   prior to 2005. In April of 2005, Linus
   Torvalds created a program now known as
   “Git” which is a version control system
   for tracking changes in computer files and
   coordinating work on those files among
   multiple people. Every Git directory on
   every computer contains an accurate
   repository with complete history and full
   version tracking abilities.  Every Git
   directory captures the identity of
   contributors.  Development of the Linux
   kernel has been tracked and managed using
   Git since April of 2005.

   One of the findings in the report is that
   since the 2.6.11 release in 2005, a total
   of 15,637 developers have contributed to
   the Linux Kernel.

7. I have been an advisor on the Cregit
   project and compared its results to other
   methods that have been used to identify
   contributors and contributions to the
   Linux Kernel, such as a tool known as “git
   blame” that is used by developers to
   identify contributions to a git repository
   such as the repositories used by the Linux
   Kernel project.

8. I have been shown documents related to
   court actions by Patrick McHardy to
   enforce copyright claims regarding the
   Linux Kernel. I have heard many people
   familiar with the court actions discuss
   the cases and the threats of injunction
   McHardy leverages to obtain financial
   settlements. I have not otherwise been
   involved in any of the previous court
   actions.

II. With regard to the facts:

1. The Linux Kernel project started in 1991
   with a release of code authored entirely
   by Linus Torvalds (who is also currently a
   Linux Foundation Fellow).  Since that time
   there have been a variety of ways in which
   contributions and contributors to the
   Linux Kernel have been tracked and
   identified. I am familiar with these
   records.

2. The first record of any contribution
   explicitly attributed to Patrick McHardy
   to the Linux kernel is April 23, 2002.
   McHardy’s last contribution to the Linux
   Kernel was made on November 24, 2015.

3. The Linux Kernel 2.5.12 was released by
   Linus Torvalds on April 30, 2002.

4. After review of the relevant records, I
   conclude that there is no evidence in the
   records that the Kernel community relies
   upon to identify contributions and
   contributors that Patrick McHardy made any
   code contributions to versions of the
   Linux Kernel earlier than 2.4.18 and
   2.5.12. Attached as Exhibit A is a list of
   Kernel releases which have no evidence in
   the relevant records of any contribution
   by Patrick McHardy.

March 11, 2018 01:51 AM

February 05, 2018

Greg KH

Linux Kernel Release Model

Note

This post is based on a whitepaper I wrote at the beginning of 2016 to be used to help many different companies understand the Linux kernel release model and encourage them to start taking the LTS stable updates more often. I then used it as a basis of a presentation I gave at the Linux Recipes conference in September 2017 which can be seen here.

With the recent craziness of Meltdown and Spectre , I’ve seen lots of things written about how Linux is released and how we handle handles security patches that are totally incorrect, so I figured it is time to dust off the text, update it in a few places, and publish this here for everyone to benefit from.

I would like to thank the reviewers who helped shape the original whitepaper, which has helped many companies understand that they need to stop “cherry picking” random patches into their device kernels. Without their help, this post would be a total mess. All problems and mistakes in here are, of course, all mine. If you notice any, or have any questions about this, please let me know.

Overview

This post describes how the Linux kernel development model works, what a long term supported kernel is, how the kernel developers approach security bugs, and why all systems that use Linux should be using all of the stable releases and not attempting to pick and choose random patches.

Linux Kernel development model

The Linux kernel is the largest collaborative software project ever. In 2017, over 4,300 different developers from over 530 different companies contributed to the project. There were 5 different releases in 2017, with each release containing between 12,000 and 14,500 different changes. On average, 8.5 changes are accepted into the Linux kernel every hour, every hour of the day. A non-scientific study (i.e. Greg’s mailbox) shows that each change needs to be submitted 2-3 times before it is accepted into the kernel source tree due to the rigorous review and testing process that all kernel changes are put through, so the engineering effort happening is much larger than the 8 changes per hour.

At the end of 2017 the size of the Linux kernel was just over 61 thousand files consisting of 25 million lines of code, build scripts, and documentation (kernel release 4.14). The Linux kernel contains the code for all of the different chip architectures and hardware drivers that it supports. Because of this, an individual system only runs a fraction of the whole codebase. An average laptop uses around 2 million lines of kernel code from 5 thousand files to function properly, while the Pixel phone uses 3.2 million lines of kernel code from 6 thousand files due to the increased complexity of a SoC.

Kernel release model

With the release of the 2.6 kernel in December of 2003, the kernel developer community switched from the previous model of having a separate development and stable kernel branch, and moved to a “stable only” branch model. A new release happened every 2 to 3 months, and that release was declared “stable” and recommended for all users to run. This change in development model was due to the very long release cycle prior to the 2.6 kernel (almost 3 years), and the struggle to maintain two different branches of the codebase at the same time.

The numbering of the kernel releases started out being 2.6.x, where x was an incrementing number that changed on every release The value of the number has no meaning, other than it is newer than the previous kernel release. In July 2011, Linus Torvalds changed the version number to 3.x after the 2.6.39 kernel was released. This was done because the higher numbers were starting to cause confusion among users, and because Greg Kroah-Hartman, the stable kernel maintainer, was getting tired of the large numbers and bribed Linus with a fine bottle of Japanese whisky.

The change to the 3.x numbering series did not mean anything other than a change of the major release number, and this happened again in April 2015 with the movement from the 3.19 release to the 4.0 release number. It is not remembered if any whisky exchanged hands when this happened. At the current kernel release rate, the number will change to 5.x sometime in 2018.

Stable kernel releases

The Linux kernel stable release model started in 2005, when the existing development model of the kernel (a new release every 2-3 months) was determined to not be meeting the needs of most users. Users wanted bugfixes that were made during those 2-3 months, and the Linux distributions were getting tired of trying to keep their kernels up to date without any feedback from the kernel community. Trying to keep individual kernels secure and with the latest bugfixes was a large and confusing effort by lots of different individuals.

Because of this, the stable kernel releases were started. These releases are based directly on Linus’s releases, and are released every week or so, depending on various external factors (time of year, available patches, maintainer workload, etc.)

The numbering of the stable releases starts with the number of the kernel release, and an additional number is added to the end of it.

For example, the 4.9 kernel is released by Linus, and then the stable kernel releases based on this kernel are numbered 4.9.1, 4.9.2, 4.9.3, and so on. This sequence is usually shortened with the number “4.9.y” when referring to a stable kernel release tree. Each stable kernel release tree is maintained by a single kernel developer, who is responsible for picking the needed patches for the release, and doing the review/release process. Where these changes are found is described below.

Stable kernels are maintained for as long as the current development cycle is happening. After Linus releases a new kernel, the previous stable kernel release tree is stopped and users must move to the newer released kernel.

Long-Term Stable kernels

After a year of this new stable release process, it was determined that many different users of Linux wanted a kernel to be supported for longer than just a few months. Because of this, the Long Term Supported (LTS) kernel release came about. The first LTS kernel was 2.6.16, released in 2006. Since then, a new LTS kernel has been picked once a year. That kernel will be maintained by the kernel community for at least 2 years. See the next section for how a kernel is chosen to be a LTS release.

Currently the LTS kernels are the 4.4.y, 4.9.y, and 4.14.y releases, and a new kernel is released on average, once a week. Along with these three kernel releases, a few older kernels are still being maintained by some kernel developers at a slower release cycle due to the needs of some users and distributions.

Information about all long-term stable kernels, who is in charge of them, and how long they will be maintained, can be found on the kernel.org release page.

LTS kernel releases average 9-10 patches accepted per day, while the normal stable kernel releases contain 10-15 patches per day. The number of patches fluctuates per release given the current time of the corresponding development kernel release, and other external variables. The older a LTS kernel is, the less patches are applicable to it, because many recent bugfixes are not relevant to older kernels. However, the older a kernel is, the harder it is to backport the changes that are needed to be applied, due to the changes in the codebase. So while there might be a lower number of overall patches being applied, the effort involved in maintaining a LTS kernel is greater than maintaining the normal stable kernel.

Choosing the LTS kernel

The method of picking which kernel the LTS release will be, and who will maintain it, has changed over the years from an semi-random method, to something that is hopefully more reliable.

Originally it was merely based on what kernel the stable maintainer’s employer was using for their product (2.6.16.y and 2.6.27.y) in order to make the effort of maintaining that kernel easier. Other distribution maintainers saw the benefit of this model and got together and colluded to get their companies to all release a product based on the same kernel version without realizing it (2.6.32.y). After that was very successful, and allowed developers to share work across companies, those companies decided to not do that anymore, so future LTS kernels were picked on an individual distribution’s needs and maintained by different developers (3.0.y, 3.2.y, 3.12.y, 3.16.y, and 3.18.y) creating more work and confusion for everyone involved.

This ad-hoc method of catering to only specific Linux distributions was not beneficial to the millions of devices that used Linux in an embedded system and were not based on a traditional Linux distribution. Because of this, Greg Kroah-Hartman decided that the choice of the LTS kernel needed to change to a method in which companies can plan on using the LTS kernel in their products. The rule became “one kernel will be picked each year, and will be maintained for two years.” With that rule, the 3.4.y, 3.10.y, and 3.14.y kernels were picked.

Due to a large number of different LTS kernels being released all in the same year, causing lots of confusion for vendors and users, the rule of no new LTS kernels being based on an individual distribution’s needs was created. This was agreed upon at the annual Linux kernel summit and started with the 4.1.y LTS choice.

During this process, the LTS kernel would only be announced after the release happened, making it hard for companies to plan ahead of time what to use in their new product, causing lots of guessing and misinformation to be spread around. This was done on purpose as previously, when companies and kernel developers knew ahead of time what the next LTS kernel was going to be, they relaxed their normal stringent review process and allowed lots of untested code to be merged (2.6.32.y). The fallout of that mess took many months to unwind and stabilize the kernel to a proper level.

The kernel community discussed this issue at its annual meeting and decided to mark the 4.4.y kernel as a LTS kernel release, much to the surprise of everyone involved, with the goal that the next LTS kernel would be planned ahead of time to be based on the last kernel release of 2016 in order to provide enough time for companies to release products based on it in the next holiday season (2017). This is how the 4.9.y and 4.14.y kernels were picked as the LTS kernel releases.

This process seems to have worked out well, without many problems being reported against the 4.9.y tree, despite it containing over 16,000 changes, making it the largest kernel to ever be released.

Future LTS kernels should be planned based on this release cycle (the last kernel of the year). This should allow SoC vendors to plan ahead on their development cycle to not release new chipsets based on older, and soon to be obsolete, LTS kernel versions.

Stable kernel patch rules

The rules for what can be added to a stable kernel release have remained almost identical for the past 12 years. The full list of the rules for patches to be accepted into a stable kernel release can be found in the Documentation/process/stable_kernel_rules.rst kernel file and are summarized here. A stable kernel change:

  • must be obviously correct and tested.
  • must not be bigger than 100 lines.
  • must fix only one thing.
  • must fix something that has been reported to be an issue.
  • can be a new device id or quirk for hardware, but not add major new functionality
  • must already be merged into Linus’s tree

The last rule, “a change must be in Linus’s tree”, prevents the kernel community from losing fixes. The community never wants a fix to go into a stable kernel release that is not already in Linus’s tree so that anyone who upgrades should never see a regression. This prevents many problems that other projects who maintain a stable and development branch can have.

Kernel Updates

The Linux kernel community has promised its userbase that no upgrade will ever break anything that is currently working in a previous release. That promise was made in 2007 at the annual Kernel developer summit in Cambridge, England, and still holds true today. Regressions do happen, but those are the highest priority bugs and are either quickly fixed, or the change that caused the regression is quickly reverted from the Linux kernel tree.

This promise holds true for both the incremental stable kernel updates, as well as the larger “major” updates that happen every three months.

The kernel community can only make this promise for the code that is merged into the Linux kernel tree. Any code that is merged into a device’s kernel that is not in the kernel.org releases is unknown and interactions with it can never be planned for, or even considered. Devices based on Linux that have large patchsets can have major issues when updating to newer kernels, because of the huge number of changes between each release. SoC patchsets are especially known to have issues with updating to newer kernels due to their large size and heavy modification of architecture specific, and sometimes core, kernel code.

Most SoC vendors do want to get their code merged upstream before their chips are released, but the reality of project-planning cycles and ultimately the business priorities of these companies prevent them from dedicating sufficient resources to the task. This, combined with the historical difficulty of pushing updates to embedded devices, results in almost all of them being stuck on a specific kernel release for the entire lifespan of the device.

Because of the large out-of-tree patchsets, most SoC vendors are starting to standardize on using the LTS releases for their devices. This allows devices to receive bug and security updates directly from the Linux kernel community, without having to rely on the SoC vendor’s backporting efforts, which traditionally are very slow to respond to problems.

It is encouraging to see that the Android project has standardized on the LTS kernels as a “minimum kernel version requirement”. Hopefully that will allow the SoC vendors to continue to update their device kernels in order to provide more secure devices for their users.

Security

When doing kernel releases, the Linux kernel community almost never declares specific changes as “security fixes”. This is due to the basic problem of the difficulty in determining if a bugfix is a security fix or not at the time of creation. Also, many bugfixes are only determined to be security related after much time has passed, so to keep users from getting a false sense of security by not taking patches, the kernel community strongly recommends always taking all bugfixes that are released.

Linus summarized the reasoning behind this behavior in an email to the Linux Kernel mailing list in 2008:

On Wed, 16 Jul 2008, pageexec@freemail.hu wrote:
>
> you should check out the last few -stable releases then and see how
> the announcement doesn't ever mention the word 'security' while fixing
> security bugs

Umm. What part of "they are just normal bugs" did you have issues with?

I expressly told you that security bugs should not be marked as such,
because bugs are bugs.

> in other words, it's all the more reason to have the commit say it's
> fixing a security issue.

No.

> > I'm just saying that why mark things, when the marking have no meaning?
> > People who believe in them are just _wrong_.
>
> what is wrong in particular?

You have two cases:

 - people think the marking is somehow trustworthy.

   People are WRONG, and are misled by the partial markings, thinking that
   unmarked bugfixes are "less important". They aren't.

 - People don't think it matters

   People are right, and the marking is pointless.

In either case it's just stupid to mark them. I don't want to do it,
because I don't want to perpetuate the myth of "security fixes" as a
separate thing from "plain regular bug fixes".

They're all fixes. They're all important. As are new features, for that
matter.

> when you know that you're about to commit a patch that fixes a security
> bug, why is it wrong to say so in the commit?

It's pointless and wrong because it makes people think that other bugs
aren't potential security fixes.

What was unclear about that?

    Linus

This email can be found here, and the whole thread is recommended reading for anyone who is curious about this topic.

When security problems are reported to the kernel community, they are fixed as soon as possible and pushed out publicly to the development tree and the stable releases. As described above, the changes are almost never described as a “security fix”, but rather look like any other bugfix for the kernel. This is done to allow affected parties the ability to update their systems before the reporter of the problem announces it.

Linus describes this method of development in the same email thread:

On Wed, 16 Jul 2008, pageexec@freemail.hu wrote:
>
> we went through this and you yourself said that security bugs are *not*
> treated as normal bugs because you do omit relevant information from such
> commits

Actually, we disagree on one fundamental thing. We disagree on
that single word: "relevant".

I do not think it's helpful _or_ relevant to explicitly point out how to
tigger a bug. It's very helpful and relevant when we're trying to chase
the bug down, but once it is fixed, it becomes irrelevant.

You think that explicitly pointing something out as a security issue is
really important, so you think it's always "relevant". And I take mostly
the opposite view. I think pointing it out is actually likely to be
counter-productive.

For example, the way I prefer to work is to have people send me and the
kernel list a patch for a fix, and then in the very next email send (in
private) an example exploit of the problem to the security mailing list
(and that one goes to the private security list just because we don't want
all the people at universities rushing in to test it). THAT is how things
should work.

Should I document the exploit in the commit message? Hell no. It's
private for a reason, even if it's real information. It was real
information for the developers to explain why a patch is needed, but once
explained, it shouldn't be spread around unnecessarily.

    Linus

Full details of how security bugs can be reported to the kernel community in order to get them resolved and fixed as soon as possible can be found in the kernel file Documentation/admin-guide/security-bugs.rst

Because security bugs are not announced to the public by the kernel team, CVE numbers for Linux kernel-related issues are usually released weeks, months, and sometimes years after the fix was merged into the stable and development branches, if at all.

Keeping a secure system

When deploying a device that uses Linux, it is strongly recommended that all LTS kernel updates be taken by the manufacturer and pushed out to their users after proper testing shows the update works well. As was described above, it is not wise to try to pick and choose various patches from the LTS releases because:

  • The releases have been reviewed by the kernel developers as a whole, not in individual parts
  • It is hard, if not impossible, to determine which patches fix “security” issues and which do not. Almost every LTS release contains at least one known security fix, and many yet “unknown”.
  • If testing shows a problem, the kernel developer community will react quickly to resolve the issue. If you wait months or years to do an update, the kernel developer community will not be able to even remember what the updates were given the long delay.
  • Changes to parts of the kernel that you do not build/run are fine and can cause no problems to your system. To try to filter out only the changes you run will cause a kernel tree that will be impossible to merge correctly with future upstream releases.

Note, this author has audited many SoC kernel trees that attempt to cherry-pick random patches from the upstream LTS releases. In every case, severe security fixes have been ignored and not applied.

As proof of this, I demoed at the Kernel Recipes talk referenced above how trivial it was to crash all of the latest flagship Android phones on the market with a tiny userspace program. The fix for this issue was released 6 months prior in the LTS kernel that the devices were based on, however none of the devices had upgraded or fixed their kernels for this problem. As of this writing (5 months later) only two devices have fixed their kernel and are now not vulnerable to that specific bug.

February 05, 2018 05:13 PM

December 30, 2017

Sri Ramkrishna

GNOME.Asia and Engagmeent update

I’ve been wanting to write a post on GNOME.Asia and the going ons with engagement for awhile, but never seemed to get the motivations to blog.  :)

GNOME.Asia was an amazing event and I wanted to reach out to the organizers and thank them for the wonderful reception that I received while I was there.  The trip to Chongqing was mostly uneventful other than the fact every Chinese official was gunning for my battery brick when going through airport security.  After a long layover in Beijing, I was landed in Chongqing and met up with Mathias Clasen and proceeded to head to the hotel.

Next day, we went on a wonderful trip to some caves in the local area that Lennart found in Lonely Planet.  We were very lucky to have Jonathan Kang with us to speak the local language as it would have been a challenging trip otherwise.  But we got to see some really interesting statues that were many centuries old.  There was one really especially interesting one that showed the Bodhisvatta with a thousand hands.  It definitely had a presence!  We came back in time to attend the reception although we were a little late.

I was lucky to have my talk on the first day which allowed me to not have to worry about my talk for the rest of the conference.  This was my first time going to a GNOME.Asia conference and everything was impressive.  First conference I’ve been to where there was a mini-drama with a fire-blower/fire-eater.  That definitely left an impression!

I gave my talk shortly after the intro, and it was well attended and I think people enjoyed it.  Most people know me that I tend to get a little energetic while on stage.

The rest of the conference, I enjoyed going to the english speaking talks, meeting with conference attendees, selfies, and everything else.  We had a day for BoFs and of course, we had an engagement one.  Well, Nuritzi and I had an engagement BoF.  :)  Apparently, writing code is still the sexy thing to do.  :-)

The conference did drive an impetus to harness the energy in Asia, and not just China, but India, Japan, S. Korea and so forth.  And after the conference, we started working in earnest to start organizing to bring in new members from Asia.

We had a lovely party on a ship, and a tour of Chongqing at night, that was really impressive.  Chongqing is really large, like one city the size of the Bay Area and possibly a larger population.  There was much fun to be had and of course more pictures and selfies and the like.

The next day was a walking tour of the city that our new friends took us around in the city.  The city reminds me a lot of Portland, simply because it was perpetually raining and foggy.  Which kept the pollution to a minimum.  The food was delicious and very spicy.  I’ve come to have a love/hate relationship with the szechuan pepper which while I like the spice, wasn’t overly fond of the numbness it causes.  Where in the cities on the west coast, the smell of cannibis shows up, so does the aroma of szechuan peppers in Chongqing!

I went shopping on the last day of my trip there and finally the next morning headed back to Denver.  Chinese security confiscated my power brick of which I was quite irate about.  I had that thing for 3 years, and I hated letting it go.  Of course as luck what have it, I needed it charged by the time I got out in Denver and had to spend an extra hour to charge my phone in order to go home. :(

Post conference, there has been a lot of re-organization to accommodate the Asian members of GNOME engagement.  We have moved to a new time and hopefully we can use some of amazing talent that some of our new members have in some of the engagement things.

Thanks to Carlos, we were able to also start using gitlab as a way to project manage social media and you’ll find that in the past 6 weeks that GNOME engagement social media are tracked in issues, and are getting completed.  The side effect is that work done by the engagement team are no longer opaque and instead the entire project can see what the team is doing.  Our engagement internally with the rest of the project has improved markedly.  We hope to continue making progress and improving the engagement team.  Our meetings are half discussions and have work sessions so that we remove items out of our todo.

There has never been a better time to get involved with GNOME engagement.  As a recent blog post by Christian Hergert has underscored, the project in order to grow needs to be able to have non-coding skills like project management, graphics artists, designers, and community managers.  We’re also a bit of a counter-culture group compared to the rest of the project.  So if you are interested in the people behind GNOME, the users of our software, or solving humanistic problems, come join us and let’s chat!

I would like to finally thank the GNOME Foundation for sponsoring my trip to GNOME.Asia.  I would not have been able to go otherwise.

sponsored by GNOME Foundation

by sri at December 30, 2017 09:15 PM

October 02, 2017

Sri Ramkrishna

GUADEC – Engagement Going Ons

I just realized that I had not posted anything from GUADEC or talked about the Engagement BoF. Given the absence of any conversation on this, I thought I would post my thoughts. I am of course aware of the irony of the engagement team not communicating. :-) Onwards and onwards:

GUADEC 2017 was a fantastic this year and of course for me it is always meeting my friends, catch up with what people have been up to and so forth. Having run the gambit of conferences, GUADEC is refreshing because it is a pure community conference vs say Linux Foundation or some other event that isn’t singularly focused like this one is. Don’t get me wrong, those are fun and I have a different set of friends I enjoy meeting and talking with. But it is the unity of purpose and working together to create something.

After the core days, we had two days of BoF’s for the engagement team. This year, we focused on a number of initiatives.

Ubuntu Release
————–
We had extensive conversations on how to deal with Ubuntu migration to GNOME and the influx of people who may not be familiar with GNOME having coming from Unity.

The idea is to find a way to help with the migration and welcome to the new Ubuntu people.

Website
——-

We talked lot about the website and what we would like to see in a website refresh. In short, we want to focus more on community, not enough excitement generated, need to be more inclusive. Other things we want to do is focus on highlighting how to do donations.

Community Management
——————–

We aren’t really tracking how successful we are. We have no metrics, and that is something that needs to be formulated. We also need to analyze a lot of where are traffic is coming from and how to engage users who are not coming from Linux.

Newcomers
———

We want to start looking into creating newcomers guides not just for coders but for other areas, like internationalization, engagement, and other areas. We want to create an open space that people with any skillset can find a place within GNOME.

Kudos:

Want to thank everyone who worked on the Happy Birthday GNOME website. Huge thanks to Tom Tryfonidis who has taken up the large share of the website work in GNOME and deserves are deep and sincere thanks for his work. He has made so many things possible for us and all of us in the engagement team owe a debt of gratitude to him.

That’s it for now!

Also would like to sincerely thank the GNOME Foundation for sponsoring my trip to GUADEC of which without their help I would not be able to attend.

Sponsored by GNOME Foundation

by sri at October 02, 2017 01:34 AM

April 06, 2009

Darrick Wong

September 03, 2009

Valerie Aurora

Carbon METRIC BUTTLOAD print

I just read Charlie Stross's rant on reducing his household's carbon footprint. Summary: He and his wife can live a life of monastic discomfort, wearing moldy scratchy 10-year-old bamboo fiber jumpsuits and shivering in their flat - or, they can cut out one transatlantic flight per year and achieve the equivalent carbon footprint reduction.

I did a similar analysis back around 2007 or so and had the same result: I've got a relatively trim carbon footprint compared to your average first-worlder, except for the air travel that turns it into a bloated planet-eating monster too extreme to fall under the delicate term "footprint." Like Charlie, I am too practical, too technophilic, and too hopeful to accept that the only hope of saving the planet is to regress to third world living standards (fucking eco-ascetics!). I decided that I would only make changes that made my life better, not worse - e.g., living in a walkable urban center (downtown Portland, now SF). But the air travel was a stumper. I liked traveling, and flying around the world for conferences is a vital component of saving the world through open source. Isn't it? Isn't it?

Two things happened that made me re-evaluate my air travel philosophy. One, I started a file systems consulting business and didn't have a lot of spare cash to spend on fripperies. Two, I hurt my back and sitting became massively uncomfortable (still recovering from that one). So I cut down on the flying around the world to Linux conferences involuntarily.

You know what I discovered? I LOVE not flying around the world for Linux conferences. I love taking only a few flights a year. I love flying mostly in the same time zone (yay, West coast). I love having the energy to travel for fun because I'm not all dragged out by the conference circuit. I love hanging out with my friends who live in the same city instead of missing out on all the parties because I'm in fucking Venezuela instead.

Save the planet. Burn your frequent flyer card.

September 03, 2009 07:04 AM

March 04, 2013

Twitter

March 01, 2013

Twitter

February 18, 2009

Stephen Hemminger

Parallelizing netfilter

The Linux networking receive performance has been mostly single threaded until the advent of MSI-X and multiqueue receive hardware. Now with many cards, it is possible to be processing packets on multiple CPU's and cores at once. All this is great, and improves performance for the simple case.

But most users don't just use simple networking. They use useful features like netfilter to do firewalling, NAT, connection tracking and all other forms of wierd and wonderful things. The netfilter code has been tuned over the years, but there are still several hot locks in the receive path. Most of these are reader-writer locks which are actually the worst kind, much worse than a simple spin lock. The problem with locks on modern CPU's is that even for the uncontested case, a lock operation means a full-stop cache miss.

With the help of Eric Duzmet, Rick Jones, Martin Josefsson and others, it looks like there is a solution to most of these. I am excited to see how it all pans out but it could mean a big performance increase for any kind of netfilter packet intensive processing. Stay tuned.

by Linux Network Plumber (noreply@blogger.com) at February 18, 2009 05:51 AM

September 25, 2010

Andy Grover

Plumbers Down Under

<p>Since the original <a href="http://www.linuxplumbersconf.org/">Linux Plumbers Conference</a> drew much inspiration from <a href="http://lca2011.linux.org.au/">LCA</a>'s continuing success, it's cool to see some of what Plumbers has done be seen as <a href="http://airlied.livejournal.com/73491.html">worthy of emulating at next year's LCA</a>!</p><p>LCA seems like a great opportunity to specifically try to make progress on cross-project issues. It's quite well-attended so it's likely the people you need in the room to make a decision will be <em>in the room</em>.</p>

by andy.grover at September 25, 2010 01:50 PM

September 10, 2010

Andy Grover

Increasing office presence for remote workers

<p>I work from home. My basement, actually. I recently read an article in the Times about <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/05/science/05robots.html?_r=1&amp;pagewanted=1">increasing the office presence of remote employees with robots</a>. Pretty interesting. How much does one of those robo-Beltzners cost? $5k? This is a neat idea but it's still not released so who knows.<br /><br />I've been thinking about other options for establishing a stronger office presence for myself. Recently I bought a webcam. If I used this to broadcast me, sitting at my desk on Ustream or Livestream, that would certainly make it so my coworkers (and the rest of the world) could see what I was up to, every second of the workday. This is actually a lot <i>more</i> exposure than an office worker, even in a cubicle, would expect. If I'm in an office cube, I might have people stop by, but I'll know they're there, and they won't <i>always</i> be there.&nbsp; There is still generally solitude and privacy to concentrate on the code and be productive. I'm currently trying something that I think is closer to the balance of a real office:<br /><ul><li>Take snapshots from webcam every 15 minutes<br /></li><li>Only during normal working hours</li><li>Give 3 second audible warning before capturing</li><li>Upload to an intranet webserver</li></ul>I haven't found this to be too much of an imposition -- in fact, the quarter-hourly beeps are somewhat like a clock chime.<br /><br />In the beginning, it's hard to resist mugging for the camera, but that passes:<br /><img style="max-width: 800px;" src="http://oss.oracle.com/%7Eagrover/pics/blog/whassup.jpg" alt="whassup???" height="240" width="320" /><br />Think about how this is better than irc or IM, both of which <i>do</i> have activity/presence indicators, but which either aren't used, or poorly implemented and often wrong. How much more likely are you, as a colleague of mine, to IM, email, video chat, or call me if you can see I'm at my desk and working? No more "around?" messages needed. You could even see if I'm looking cheerful, or perhaps otherwise indisposed, heh heh:<br /><img style="max-width: 800px;" src="http://oss.oracle.com/%7Eagrover/pics/blog/cat1.jpg" alt="hello kitty" height="240" width="320" /><br />On a technical note, although there were many Debian packages that kind-of did what I wanted, it turned out to be surprisingly easy to roll my own in about <a href="http://github.com/agrover/pysnapper/blob/master/webcam.py">20 lines of Python</a>.<br /><img style="max-width: 800px;" src="http://oss.oracle.com/%7Eagrover/pics/blog/working.jpg" alt="working hard." height="240" width="320" /><br />Anyways, just something I've been playing around with, while I wait for my robo-avatar to be set up down at HQ...</p>

by andy.grover at September 10, 2010 05:20 PM

November 08, 2009

Valerie Aurora

Migrated to WordPress

My LiveJournal blog name - valhenson - was the last major holdover from my old name, Val Henson. I got a new Social Security card, passport, and driver's license with my new name several months ago, but migrating my blog? That's hard! Or something. I finally got around to moving to a brand-spanking-new blog at WordPress:

Valerie Aurora's blog

Update your RSS reader with the above if you still want to read my blog - I won't be republishing my posts to my new blog on this LiveJournal blog.

If you're aware of any other current instances of "Val Henson" or "Valerie Henson," let me know! I obviously can't change my name on historical documents, like research papers or interviews, but if it's vaguely real-time-ish, I'd like to update it.

One web page I'm going to keep as Val Henson for historical reasons is my Val Henson is a Man joke. Several of the pages on my web site were created after the fact as vehicles for amusing pictures or graphics I had lying around. In this case, my friend Dana Sibera created a pretty damn cool picture of me with a full beard and I had to do something with it.



It's doubly wild now that I have such short hair.

November 08, 2009 11:36 PM