Planet Linux Plumbers Conf

June 03, 2009

Darrick Wong

Picspam!

/me rounded up a bunch of (old) panoramas and put them into the high-definition panorama viewer. Be sure to check out the (huge spike in memory cache when you load the) panorama previewer (click the "See All" button).

June 03, 2009 02:27 AM

August 27, 2008

Stephen Hemminger

Exploring transactional filesystems

In order to implement router style semantics, Vyatta allows setting many different configuration variables and then applying them all at once with a commit command. Currently, this is implemented by a combination of shell magic and unionfs. The problem is that keeping unionfs up to date and fixing the resulting crashes is major pain.

There must be better alternatives, current options include:
  • Replace unionfs with aufs which has less users yelling at it and more developers.
  • Use a filesystem like btrfs which has snapshots. This changes the model and makes api's like "what changed?" hard to implement.
  • Move to a pure userspace model using git. The problem here is that git as currently written is meant for users not transactions.
  • Use combination of copy, bind mount, and rsync.
  • Use a database for configuration. This is easier for general queries but is the most work. Conversion from existing format would be a pain.
Looks like a fun/hard problem. Don't expect any resolution soon.

by Linux Network Plumber (noreply@blogger.com) at August 27, 2008 10:20 PM

November 24, 2017

Paul E. McKenney

Parallel Programming: November 2017 Update

This USA Thanksgiving holiday weekend features a new release of Is Parallel Programming Hard, And, If So, What Can You Do About It?.

This update includes more formatting and build-system improvements, bibliography updates, and better handling of listings, all courtesy of Akira Yokosawa; numerous fixes and updates from Junchang Wang, Pierre Kuo, SeongJae Park, and Yubin Ruan; a new futures section on quantum computing; updates to the formal-verification section based on recent collaborations; and a full rewrite of the memory-barriers section, which is now its own chapter. This rewrite was of course based on recent work with my partners in memory-ordering crime, Jade Alglave, Luc Maranget, Andrea Parri, and Alan Stern.

As always, git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/paulmck/perfbook.git will be updated in real time.

November 24, 2017 11:21 PM

October 16, 2017

Greg KH

Linux Kernel Community Enforcement Statement FAQ

Based on the recent Linux Kernel Community Enforcement Statement and the article describing the background and what it means , here are some Questions/Answers to help clear things up. These are based on questions that came up when the statement was discussed among the initial round of over 200 different kernel developers.

Q: Is this changing the license of the kernel?

A: No.

Q: Seriously? It really looks like a change to the license.

A: No, the license of the kernel is still GPLv2, as before. The kernel developers are providing certain additional promises that they encourage users and adopters to rely on. And by having a specific acking process it is clear that those who ack are making commitments personally (and perhaps, if authorized, on behalf of the companies that employ them). There is nothing that says those commitments are somehow binding on anyone else. This is exactly what we have done in the past when some but not all kernel developers signed off on the driver statement.

Q: Ok, but why have this “additional permissions” document?

A: In order to help address problems caused by current and potential future copyright “trolls” aka monetizers.

Q: Ok, but how will this help address the “troll” problem?

A: “Copyright trolls” use the GPL-2.0’s immediate termination and the threat of an immediate injunction to turn an alleged compliance concern into a contract claim that gives the troll an automatic claim for money damages. The article by Heather Meeker describes this quite well, please refer to that for more details. If even a short delay is inserted for coming into compliance, that delay disrupts this expedited legal process.

By simply saying, “We think you should have 30 days to come into compliance”, we undermine that “immediacy” which supports the request to the court for an immediate injunction. The threat of an immediate junction was used to get the companies to sign contracts. Then the troll goes back after the same company for another known violation shortly after and claims they’re owed the financial penalty for breaking the contract. Signing contracts to pay damages to financially enrich one individual is completely at odds with our community’s enforcement goals.

We are showing that the community is not out for financial gain when it comes to license issues – though we do care about the company coming into compliance.  All we want is the modifications to our code to be released back to the public, and for the developers who created that code to become part of our community so that we can continue to create the best software that works well for everyone.

This is all still entirely focused on bringing the users into compliance. The 30 days can be used productively to determine exactly what is wrong, and how to resolve it.

Q: Ok, but why are we referencing GPL-3.0?

A: By using the terms from the GPLv3 for this, we use a very well-vetted and understood procedure for granting the opportunity to come fix the failure and come into compliance. We benefit from many months of work to reach agreement on a termination provision that worked in legal systems all around the world and was entirely consistent with Free Software principles.

Q: But what is the point of the “non-defensive assertion of rights” disclaimer?

A: If a copyright holder is attacked, we don’t want or need to require that copyright holder to give the party suing them an opportunity to cure. The “non-defensive assertion of rights” is just a way to leave everything unchanged for a copyright holder that gets sued.  This is no different a position than what they had before this statement.

Q: So you are ok with using Linux as a defensive copyright method?

A: There is a current copyright troll problem that is undermining confidence in our community – where a “bad actor” is attacking companies in a way to achieve personal gain. We are addressing that issue. No one has asked us to make changes to address other litigation.

Q: Ok, this document sounds like it was written by a bunch of big companies, who is behind the drafting of it and how did it all happen?

A: Grant Likely, the chairman at the time of the Linux Foundation’s Technical Advisory Board (TAB), wrote the first draft of this document when the first copyright troll issue happened a few years ago. He did this as numerous companies and developers approached the TAB asking that the Linux kernel community do something about this new attack on our community. He showed the document to a lot of kernel developers and a few company representatives in order to get feedback on how it should be worded. After the troll seemed to go away, this work got put on the back-burner. When the copyright troll showed back up, along with a few other “copycat” like individuals, the work on the document was started back up by Chris Mason, the current chairman of the TAB. He worked with the TAB members, other kernel developers, lawyers who have been trying to defend these claims in Germany, and the TAB members’ Linux Foundation’s lawyers, in order to rework the document so that it would actually achieve the intended benefits and be useful in stopping these new attacks. The document was then reviewed and revised with input from Linus Torvalds and finally a document that the TAB agreed would be sufficient was finished. That document was then sent to over 200 of the most active kernel developers for the past year by Greg Kroah-Hartman to see if they, or their company, wished to support the document. That produced the initial “signatures” on the document, and the acks of the patch that added it to the Linux kernel source tree.

Q: How do I add my name to the document?

A: If you are a developer of the Linux kernel, simply send Greg a patch adding your name to the proper location in the document (sorting the names by last name), and he will be glad to accept it.

Q: How can my company show its support of this document?

A: If you are a developer working for a company that wishes to show that they also agree with this document, have the developer put the company name in ‘(’ ‘)’ after the developer’s name. This shows that both the developer, and the company behind the developer are in agreement with this statement.

Q: How can a company or individual that is not part of the Linux kernel community show its support of the document?

A: Become part of our community! Send us patches, surely there is something that you want to see changed in the kernel. If not, wonderful, post something on your company web site, or personal blog in support of this statement, we don’t mind that at all.

Q: I’ve been approached by a copyright troll for Netfilter. What should I do?

A: Please see the Netfilter FAQ here for how to handle this

Q: I have another question, how do I ask it?

A: Email Greg or the TAB, and they will be glad to help answer them.

October 16, 2017 09:05 AM

Linux Kernel Community Enforcement Statement

By Greg Kroah-Hartman, Chris Mason, Rik van Riel, Shuah Khan, and Grant Likely

The Linux kernel ecosystem of developers, companies and users has been wildly successful by any measure over the last couple decades. Even today, 26 years after the initial creation of the Linux kernel, the kernel developer community continues to grow, with more than 500 different companies and over 4,000 different developers getting changes merged into the tree during the past year. As Greg always says every year, the kernel continues to change faster this year than the last, this year we were running around 8.5 changes an hour, with 10,000 lines of code added, 2,000 modified, and 2,500 lines removed every hour of every day.

The stunning growth and widespread adoption of Linux, however, also requires ever evolving methods of achieving compliance with the terms of our community’s chosen license, the GPL-2.0. At this point, there is no lack of clarity on the base compliance expectations of our community. Our goals as an ecosystem are to make sure new participants are made aware of those expectations and the materials available to assist them, and to help them grow into our community.  Some of us spend a lot of time traveling to different companies all around the world doing this, and lots of other people and groups have been working tirelessly to create practical guides for everyone to learn how to use Linux in a way that is compliant with the license. Some of these activities include:

Unfortunately the same processes that we use to assure fulfillment of license obligations and availability of source code can also be used unjustly in trolling activities to extract personal monetary rewards. In particular, issues have arisen as a developer from the Netfilter community, Patrick McHardy, has sought to enforce his copyright claims in secret and for large sums of money by threatening or engaging in litigation. Some of his compliance claims are issues that should and could easily be resolved. However, he has also made claims based on ambiguities in the GPL-2.0 that no one in our community has ever considered part of compliance.  

Examples of these claims have been distributing over-the-air firmware, requiring a cell phone maker to deliver a paper copy of source code offer letter; claiming the source code server must be setup with a download speed as fast as the binary server based on the “equivalent access” language of Section 3; requiring the GPL-2.0 to be delivered in a local language; and many others.

How he goes about this activity was recently documented very well by Heather Meeker.

Numerous active contributors to the kernel community have tried to reach out to Patrick to have a discussion about his activities, to no response. Further, the Netfilter community suspended Patrick from contributing for violations of their principles of enforcement. The Netfilter community also published their own FAQ on this matter.

While the kernel community has always supported enforcement efforts to bring companies into compliance, we have never even considered enforcement for the purpose of extracting monetary gain.  It is not possible to know an exact figure due to the secrecy of Patrick’s actions, but we are aware of activity that has resulted in payments of at least a few million Euros.  We are also aware that these actions, which have continued for at least four years, have threatened the confidence in our ecosystem.

Because of this, and to help clarify what the majority of Linux kernel community members feel is the correct way to enforce our license, the Technical Advisory Board of the Linux Foundation has worked together with lawyers in our community, individual developers, and many companies that participate in the development of, and rely on Linux, to draft a Kernel Enforcement Statement to help address both this specific issue we are facing today, and to help prevent any future issues like this from happening again.

A key goal of all enforcement of the GPL-2.0 license has and continues to be bringing companies into compliance with the terms of the license. The Kernel Enforcement Statement is designed to do just that.  It adopts the same termination provisions we are all familiar with from GPL-3.0 as an Additional Permission giving companies confidence that they will have time to come into compliance if a failure is identified. Their ability to rely on this Additional Permission will hopefully re-establish user confidence and help direct enforcement activity back to the original purpose we have all sought over the years – actual compliance.  

Kernel developers in our ecosystem may put their own acknowledgement to the Statement by sending a patch to Greg adding their name to the Statement, like any other kernel patch submission, and it will be gladly merged. Those authorized to ‘ack’ on behalf of their company may add their company name in (parenthesis) after their name as well.

Note, a number of questions did come up when this was discussed with the kernel developer community. Please see Greg’s FAQ post answering the most common ones if you have further questions about this topic.

October 16, 2017 09:00 AM

October 11, 2017

Paul E. McKenney

Stupid RCU Tricks: In the audience for a pair of RCU talks!

I had the privilege of attending CPPCON last month. Michael Wong, Maged Michael, and I presented a parallel-programming overview, in which I presented the "Hardware and its Habits" chapter of Is Parallel Programming Hard, And, If So, What Can You Do About It?.

But the highlight for me was actually sitting in the audience for a pair of talks by people who had implemented RCU in C++.

Ansel Sermersheim presented a two-part talk entitled Multithreading is the answer. What is the question?. The second part of this talk covered lockless containers, and used a variant of RCU to implement a low-overhead libGuarded facility in order to more easily avoid deadlocks. The implementation is similar to the Linux-kernel real-time RCU implementation by Jim Houston and Joe Korty in that the counterpart to rcu_read_unlock() actively registers a quiescent state. Ansel's implementation goes further by also driving callback invocation from rcu_read_unlock(). Now I don't recommend this for a general-purpose RCU implementation due to the possibility of deadlock should a resource need to be held across rcu_read_unlock() and acquired within the callback. However, this approach should work just fine in the case where the callbacks just free memory and the memory allocator does not contain too many RCU read-side critical sections.

Fedor Pikus presented a talk entitled Read, Copy, Update, then what? RCU for non-kernel programmers, in which he gave a quite-decent introduction to use of RCU. This introduction included an improved version of my long-standing where-to-use-RCU diagram, which I fully intend to incorporate. I had a number of but-you-could moments, including the usual "put the size in with the array" advice, ways of updating things already exposed to readers, and the fact that RCU really can tolerate multiple writers, along with some concerns about counter overflow. Nevertheless, an impressive amount of great information in a one-hour talk!

It is very good to see more people making use of RCU!

October 11, 2017 09:47 PM

October 02, 2017

Sri Ramkrishna

GUADEC – Engagement Going Ons

I just realized that I had not posted anything from GUADEC or talked about the Engagement BoF. Given the absence of any conversation on this, I thought I would post my thoughts. I am of course aware of the irony of the engagement team not communicating. :-) Onwards and onwards:

GUADEC 2017 was a fantastic this year and of course for me it is always meeting my friends, catch up with what people have been up to and so forth. Having run the gambit of conferences, GUADEC is refreshing because it is a pure community conference vs say Linux Foundation or some other event that isn’t singularly focused like this one is. Don’t get me wrong, those are fun and I have a different set of friends I enjoy meeting and talking with. But it is the unity of purpose and working together to create something.

After the core days, we had two days of BoF’s for the engagement team. This year, we focused on a number of initiatives.

Ubuntu Release
————–
We had extensive conversations on how to deal with Ubuntu migration to GNOME and the influx of people who may not be familiar with GNOME having coming from Unity.

The idea is to find a way to help with the migration and welcome to the new Ubuntu people.

Website
——-

We talked lot about the website and what we would like to see in a website refresh. In short, we want to focus more on community, not enough excitement generated, need to be more inclusive. Other things we want to do is focus on highlighting how to do donations.

Community Management
——————–

We aren’t really tracking how successful we are. We have no metrics, and that is something that needs to be formulated. We also need to analyze a lot of where are traffic is coming from and how to engage users who are not coming from Linux.

Newcomers
———

We want to start looking into creating newcomers guides not just for coders but for other areas, like internationalization, engagement, and other areas. We want to create an open space that people with any skillset can find a place within GNOME.

Kudos:

Want to thank everyone who worked on the Happy Birthday GNOME website. Huge thanks to Tom Tryfonidis who has taken up the large share of the website work in GNOME and deserves are deep and sincere thanks for his work. He has made so many things possible for us and all of us in the engagement team owe a debt of gratitude to him.

That’s it for now!

Also would like to sincerely thank the GNOME Foundation for sponsoring my trip to GUADEC of which without their help I would not be able to attend.

Sponsored by GNOME Foundation

by sri at October 02, 2017 01:34 AM

September 22, 2016

Sri Ramkrishna

Making money from copylefted code

I wanted to put this out there while I still have it fresh in my mind. Here at the copyleft BoF with Bradlely Kuhn at LAS GNOME. One of the biggest take away from this is something that Bryan Lunduke said that people are able to make money off from copyleft if we don’t actually brand it as free and open source software. So it seems that if we don’t advertise something as free or open source or that there is software available, then there is a decent chance that you can make money.

Which goes back to the interesting conversation we had the previous day on pretty much the same topic. Just fascinating stuff.

by sri at September 22, 2016 06:04 PM

April 06, 2009

Darrick Wong

September 03, 2009

Valerie Aurora

Carbon METRIC BUTTLOAD print

I just read Charlie Stross's rant on reducing his household's carbon footprint. Summary: He and his wife can live a life of monastic discomfort, wearing moldy scratchy 10-year-old bamboo fiber jumpsuits and shivering in their flat - or, they can cut out one transatlantic flight per year and achieve the equivalent carbon footprint reduction.

I did a similar analysis back around 2007 or so and had the same result: I've got a relatively trim carbon footprint compared to your average first-worlder, except for the air travel that turns it into a bloated planet-eating monster too extreme to fall under the delicate term "footprint." Like Charlie, I am too practical, too technophilic, and too hopeful to accept that the only hope of saving the planet is to regress to third world living standards (fucking eco-ascetics!). I decided that I would only make changes that made my life better, not worse - e.g., living in a walkable urban center (downtown Portland, now SF). But the air travel was a stumper. I liked traveling, and flying around the world for conferences is a vital component of saving the world through open source. Isn't it? Isn't it?

Two things happened that made me re-evaluate my air travel philosophy. One, I started a file systems consulting business and didn't have a lot of spare cash to spend on fripperies. Two, I hurt my back and sitting became massively uncomfortable (still recovering from that one). So I cut down on the flying around the world to Linux conferences involuntarily.

You know what I discovered? I LOVE not flying around the world for Linux conferences. I love taking only a few flights a year. I love flying mostly in the same time zone (yay, West coast). I love having the energy to travel for fun because I'm not all dragged out by the conference circuit. I love hanging out with my friends who live in the same city instead of missing out on all the parties because I'm in fucking Venezuela instead.

Save the planet. Burn your frequent flyer card.

September 03, 2009 07:04 AM

March 04, 2013

Twitter

March 01, 2013

Twitter

February 18, 2009

Stephen Hemminger

Parallelizing netfilter

The Linux networking receive performance has been mostly single threaded until the advent of MSI-X and multiqueue receive hardware. Now with many cards, it is possible to be processing packets on multiple CPU's and cores at once. All this is great, and improves performance for the simple case.

But most users don't just use simple networking. They use useful features like netfilter to do firewalling, NAT, connection tracking and all other forms of wierd and wonderful things. The netfilter code has been tuned over the years, but there are still several hot locks in the receive path. Most of these are reader-writer locks which are actually the worst kind, much worse than a simple spin lock. The problem with locks on modern CPU's is that even for the uncontested case, a lock operation means a full-stop cache miss.

With the help of Eric Duzmet, Rick Jones, Martin Josefsson and others, it looks like there is a solution to most of these. I am excited to see how it all pans out but it could mean a big performance increase for any kind of netfilter packet intensive processing. Stay tuned.

by Linux Network Plumber (noreply@blogger.com) at February 18, 2009 05:51 AM

September 25, 2010

Andy Grover

Plumbers Down Under

<p>Since the original <a href="http://www.linuxplumbersconf.org/">Linux Plumbers Conference</a> drew much inspiration from <a href="http://lca2011.linux.org.au/">LCA</a>'s continuing success, it's cool to see some of what Plumbers has done be seen as <a href="http://airlied.livejournal.com/73491.html">worthy of emulating at next year's LCA</a>!</p><p>LCA seems like a great opportunity to specifically try to make progress on cross-project issues. It's quite well-attended so it's likely the people you need in the room to make a decision will be <em>in the room</em>.</p>

by andy.grover at September 25, 2010 01:50 PM

September 10, 2010

Andy Grover

Increasing office presence for remote workers

<p>I work from home. My basement, actually. I recently read an article in the Times about <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/05/science/05robots.html?_r=1&amp;pagewanted=1">increasing the office presence of remote employees with robots</a>. Pretty interesting. How much does one of those robo-Beltzners cost? $5k? This is a neat idea but it's still not released so who knows.<br /><br />I've been thinking about other options for establishing a stronger office presence for myself. Recently I bought a webcam. If I used this to broadcast me, sitting at my desk on Ustream or Livestream, that would certainly make it so my coworkers (and the rest of the world) could see what I was up to, every second of the workday. This is actually a lot <i>more</i> exposure than an office worker, even in a cubicle, would expect. If I'm in an office cube, I might have people stop by, but I'll know they're there, and they won't <i>always</i> be there.&nbsp; There is still generally solitude and privacy to concentrate on the code and be productive. I'm currently trying something that I think is closer to the balance of a real office:<br /><ul><li>Take snapshots from webcam every 15 minutes<br /></li><li>Only during normal working hours</li><li>Give 3 second audible warning before capturing</li><li>Upload to an intranet webserver</li></ul>I haven't found this to be too much of an imposition -- in fact, the quarter-hourly beeps are somewhat like a clock chime.<br /><br />In the beginning, it's hard to resist mugging for the camera, but that passes:<br /><img style="max-width: 800px;" src="http://oss.oracle.com/%7Eagrover/pics/blog/whassup.jpg" alt="whassup???" height="240" width="320" /><br />Think about how this is better than irc or IM, both of which <i>do</i> have activity/presence indicators, but which either aren't used, or poorly implemented and often wrong. How much more likely are you, as a colleague of mine, to IM, email, video chat, or call me if you can see I'm at my desk and working? No more "around?" messages needed. You could even see if I'm looking cheerful, or perhaps otherwise indisposed, heh heh:<br /><img style="max-width: 800px;" src="http://oss.oracle.com/%7Eagrover/pics/blog/cat1.jpg" alt="hello kitty" height="240" width="320" /><br />On a technical note, although there were many Debian packages that kind-of did what I wanted, it turned out to be surprisingly easy to roll my own in about <a href="http://github.com/agrover/pysnapper/blob/master/webcam.py">20 lines of Python</a>.<br /><img style="max-width: 800px;" src="http://oss.oracle.com/%7Eagrover/pics/blog/working.jpg" alt="working hard." height="240" width="320" /><br />Anyways, just something I've been playing around with, while I wait for my robo-avatar to be set up down at HQ...</p>

by andy.grover at September 10, 2010 05:20 PM

November 08, 2009

Valerie Aurora

Migrated to WordPress

My LiveJournal blog name - valhenson - was the last major holdover from my old name, Val Henson. I got a new Social Security card, passport, and driver's license with my new name several months ago, but migrating my blog? That's hard! Or something. I finally got around to moving to a brand-spanking-new blog at WordPress:

Valerie Aurora's blog

Update your RSS reader with the above if you still want to read my blog - I won't be republishing my posts to my new blog on this LiveJournal blog.

If you're aware of any other current instances of "Val Henson" or "Valerie Henson," let me know! I obviously can't change my name on historical documents, like research papers or interviews, but if it's vaguely real-time-ish, I'd like to update it.

One web page I'm going to keep as Val Henson for historical reasons is my Val Henson is a Man joke. Several of the pages on my web site were created after the fact as vehicles for amusing pictures or graphics I had lying around. In this case, my friend Dana Sibera created a pretty damn cool picture of me with a full beard and I had to do something with it.



It's doubly wild now that I have such short hair.

November 08, 2009 11:36 PM