Planet Linux Plumbers Conf

June 03, 2009

Darrick Wong

Picspam!

/me rounded up a bunch of (old) panoramas and put them into the high-definition panorama viewer. Be sure to check out the (huge spike in memory cache when you load the) panorama previewer (click the "See All" button).

June 03, 2009 02:27 AM

August 27, 2008

Stephen Hemminger

Exploring transactional filesystems

In order to implement router style semantics, Vyatta allows setting many different configuration variables and then applying them all at once with a commit command. Currently, this is implemented by a combination of shell magic and unionfs. The problem is that keeping unionfs up to date and fixing the resulting crashes is major pain.

There must be better alternatives, current options include:
  • Replace unionfs with aufs which has less users yelling at it and more developers.
  • Use a filesystem like btrfs which has snapshots. This changes the model and makes api's like "what changed?" hard to implement.
  • Move to a pure userspace model using git. The problem here is that git as currently written is meant for users not transactions.
  • Use combination of copy, bind mount, and rsync.
  • Use a database for configuration. This is easier for general queries but is the most work. Conversion from existing format would be a pain.
Looks like a fun/hard problem. Don't expect any resolution soon.

by Linux Network Plumber (noreply@blogger.com) at August 27, 2008 10:20 PM

January 19, 2018

Greg KH

Meltdown and Spectre Linux kernel status - update

I keep getting a lot of private emails about my previous post about the latest status of the Linux kernel patches to resolve both the Meltdown and Spectre issues.

These questions all seem to break down into two different categories, “What is the state of the Spectre kernel patches?”, and “Is my machine vunlerable?”

State of the kernel patches

As always, lwn.net covers the technical details about the latest state of the kernel patches to resolve the Spectre issues, so please go read that to find out that type of information.

And yes, it is behind a paywall for a few more weeks. You should be buying a subscription to get this type of thing!

Is my machine vunlerable?

For this question, it’s now a very simple answer, you can check it yourself.

Just run the following command at a terminal window to determine what the state of your machine is:

1
$ grep . /sys/devices/system/cpu/vulnerabilities/*

On my laptop, right now, this shows:

1
2
3
4
$ grep . /sys/devices/system/cpu/vulnerabilities/*
/sys/devices/system/cpu/vulnerabilities/meltdown:Mitigation: PTI
/sys/devices/system/cpu/vulnerabilities/spectre_v1:Vulnerable
/sys/devices/system/cpu/vulnerabilities/spectre_v2:Vulnerable: Minimal generic SM retpoline

This shows that my kernel is properly mitigating the Meltdown problem by implementing PTI (Page Table Isolation), and that my system is still vulnerable to the Spectre variant 1, but is trying really hard to resolve the variant 2, but is not quite there (because I did not build my kernel with a compiler to properly support the retpoline feature).

If your kernel does not have that sysfs directory or files, then obviously there is a problem and you need to upgrade your kernel!

Some “enterprise” distributions did not backport the changes for this reporting, so if you are running one of those types of kernels, go bug the vendor to fix that, you really want a unified way of knowing the state of your system.

Note that right now, these files are only valid for the x86-64 based kernels, all other processor types will show something like “Not affected”. As everyone knows, that is not true for the Spectre issues, except for very old CPUs, so it’s a huge hint that your kernel really is not up to date yet. Give it a few months for all other processor types to catch up and implement the correct kernel hooks to properly report this.

And yes, I need to go find a working microcode update to fix my laptop’s CPU so that it is not vulnerable against Spectre…

January 19, 2018 10:30 AM

January 06, 2018

Greg KH

Meltdown and Spectre Linux kernel status

By now, everyone knows that something “big” just got announced regarding computer security. Heck, when the Daily Mail does a report on it , you know something is bad…

Anyway, I’m not going to go into the details about the problems being reported, other than to point you at the wonderfully written Project Zero paper on the issues involved here. They should just give out the 2018 Pwnie award right now, it’s that amazingly good.

If you do want technical details for how we are resolving those issues in the kernel, see the always awesome lwn.net writeup for the details.

Also, here’s a good summary of lots of other postings that includes announcements from various vendors.

As for how this was all handled by the companies involved, well this could be described as a textbook example of how NOT to interact with the Linux kernel community properly. The people and companies involved know what happened, and I’m sure it will all come out eventually, but right now we need to focus on fixing the issues involved, and not pointing blame, no matter how much we want to.

What you can do right now

If your Linux systems are running a normal Linux distribution, go update your kernel. They should all have the updates in them already. And then keep updating them over the next few weeks, we are still working out lots of corner case bugs given that the testing involved here is complex given the huge variety of systems and workloads this affects. If your distro does not have kernel updates, then I strongly suggest changing distros right now.

However there are lots of systems out there that are not running “normal” Linux distributions for various reasons (rumor has it that it is way more than the “traditional” corporate distros). They rely on the LTS kernel updates, or the normal stable kernel updates, or they are in-house franken-kernels. For those people here’s the status of what is going on regarding all of this mess in the upstream kernels you can use.

Meltdown – x86

Right now, Linus’s kernel tree contains all of the fixes we currently know about to handle the Meltdown vulnerability for the x86 architecture. Go enable the CONFIG_PAGE_TABLE_ISOLATION kernel build option, and rebuild and reboot and all should be fine.

However, Linus’s tree is currently at 4.15-rc6 + some outstanding patches. 4.15-rc7 should be out tomorrow, with those outstanding patches to resolve some issues, but most people do not run a -rc kernel in a “normal” environment.

Because of this, the x86 kernel developers have done a wonderful job in their development of the page table isolation code, so much so that the backport to the latest stable kernel, 4.14, has been almost trivial for me to do. This means that the latest 4.14 release (4.14.12 at this moment in time), is what you should be running. 4.14.13 will be out in a few more days, with some additional fixes in it that are needed for some systems that have boot-time problems with 4.14.12 (it’s an obvious problem, if it does not boot, just add the patches now queued up.)

I would personally like to thank Andy Lutomirski, Thomas Gleixner, Ingo Molnar, Borislav Petkov, Dave Hansen, Peter Zijlstra, Josh Poimboeuf, Juergen Gross, and Linus Torvalds for all of the work they have done in getting these fixes developed and merged upstream in a form that was so easy for me to consume to allow the stable releases to work properly. Without that effort, I don’t even want to think about what would have happened.

For the older long term stable (LTS) kernels, I have leaned heavily on the wonderful work of Hugh Dickins, Dave Hansen, Jiri Kosina and Borislav Petkov to bring the same functionality to the 4.4 and 4.9 stable kernel trees. I had also had immense help from Guenter Roeck, Kees Cook, Jamie Iles, and many others in tracking down nasty bugs and missing patches. I want to also call out David Woodhouse, Eduardo Valentin, Laura Abbott, and Rik van Riel for their help with the backporting and integration as well, their help was essential in numerous tricky places.

These LTS kernels also have the CONFIG_PAGE_TABLE_ISOLATION build option that should be enabled to get complete protection.

As this backport is very different from the mainline version that is in 4.14 and 4.15, there are different bugs happening, right now we know of some VDSO issues that are getting worked on, and some odd virtual machine setups are reporting strange errors, but those are the minority at the moment, and should not stop you from upgrading at all right now. If you do run into problems with these releases, please let us know on the stable kernel mailing list.

If you rely on any other kernel tree other than 4.4, 4.9, or 4.14 right now, and you do not have a distribution supporting you, you are out of luck. The lack of patches to resolve the Meltdown problem is so minor compared to the hundreds of other known exploits and bugs that your kernel version currently contains. You need to worry about that more than anything else at this moment, and get your systems up to date first.

Also, go yell at the people who forced you to run an obsoleted and insecure kernel version, they are the ones that need to learn that doing so is a totally reckless act.

Meltdown – ARM64

Right now the ARM64 set of patches for the Meltdown issue are not merged into Linus’s tree. They are staged and ready to be merged into 4.16-rc1 once 4.15 is released in a few weeks. Because these patches are not in a released kernel from Linus yet, I can not backport them into the stable kernel releases (hey, we have rules for a reason…)

Due to them not being in a released kernel, if you rely on ARM64 for your systems (i.e. Android), I point you at the Android Common Kernel tree All of the ARM64 fixes have been merged into the 3.18, 4.4, and 4.9 branches as of this point in time.

I would strongly recommend just tracking those branches as more fixes get added over time due to testing and things catch up with what gets merged into the upstream kernel releases over time, especially as I do not know when these patches will land in the stable and LTS kernel releases at this point in time.

For the 4.4 and 4.9 LTS kernels, odds are these patches will never get merged into them, due to the large number of prerequisite patches required. All of those prerequisite patches have been long merged and tested in the android-common kernels, so I think it is a better idea to just rely on those kernel branches instead of the LTS release for ARM systems at this point in time.

Also note, I merge all of the LTS kernel updates into those branches usually within a day or so of being released, so you should be following those branches no matter what, to ensure your ARM systems are up to date and secure.

Spectre

Now things get “interesting”…

Again, if you are running a distro kernel, you might be covered as some of the distros have merged various patches into them that they claim mitigate most of the problems here. I suggest updating and testing for yourself to see if you are worried about this attack vector

For upstream, well, the status is there is no fixes merged into any upstream tree for these types of issues yet. There are numerous patches floating around on the different mailing lists that are proposing solutions for how to resolve them, but they are under heavy development, some of the patch series do not even build or apply to any known trees, the series conflict with each other, and it’s a general mess.

This is due to the fact that the Spectre issues were the last to be addressed by the kernel developers. All of us were working on the Meltdown issue, and we had no real information on exactly what the Spectre problem was at all, and what patches were floating around were in even worse shape than what have been publicly posted.

Because of all of this, it is going to take us in the kernel community a few weeks to resolve these issues and get them merged upstream. The fixes are coming in to various subsystems all over the kernel, and will be collected and released in the stable kernel updates as they are merged, so again, you are best off just staying up to date with either your distribution’s kernel releases, or the LTS and stable kernel releases.

It’s not the best news, I know, but it’s reality. If it’s any consolation, it does not seem that any other operating system has full solutions for these issues either, the whole industry is in the same boat right now, and we just need to wait and let the developers solve the problem as quickly as they can.

The proposed solutions are not trivial, but some of them are amazingly good. The Retpoline post from Paul Turner is an example of some of the new concepts being created to help resolve these issues. This is going to be an area of lots of research over the next years to come up with ways to mitigate the potential problems involved in hardware that wants to try to predict the future before it happens.

Other arches

Right now, I have not seen patches for any other architectures than x86 and arm64. There are rumors of patches floating around in some of the enterprise distributions for some of the other processor types, and hopefully they will surface in the weeks to come to get merged properly upstream. I have no idea when that will happen, if you are dependant on a specific architecture, I suggest asking on the arch-specific mailing list about this to get a straight answer.

Conclusion

Again, update your kernels, don’t delay, and don’t stop. The updates to resolve these problems will be continuing to come for a long period of time. Also, there are still lots of other bugs and security issues being resolved in the stable and LTS kernel releases that are totally independent of these types of issues, so keeping up to date is always a good idea.

Right now, there are a lot of very overworked, grumpy, sleepless, and just generally pissed off kernel developers working as hard as they can to resolve these issues that they themselves did not cause at all. Please be considerate of their situation right now. They need all the love and support and free supply of their favorite beverage that we can provide them to ensure that we all end up with fixed systems as soon as possible.

January 06, 2018 12:36 PM

January 01, 2018

Paul E. McKenney

2017 Year-End Advice

One of the occupational hazard of being an old man is the urge to provide unsolicited advice on any number of topics. This time, the topic is weight lifting.

Some years ago, I decided to start lifting weights. My body no longer tolerated running, so I had long since substituted various low-impact mechanical means of aerobic exercise. But there was growing evidence that higher muscle mass is a good thing as one ages, so I figured I should give it a try. This posting lists a couple of my mistakes, which could enable you to avoid them, which in turn could enable you to make brand-spanking new mistakes of your very own design!

The first mistake resulted in sporadic pains in my left palm and wrist, which appeared after many months of upper-body weight workouts. In my experience, at my age, any mention of this sort of thing to medical professionals will result in a tentative diagnosis of arthritis, with the only prescription being continued observation. This experience motivated me to do a bit of self-debugging beforehand, which led me to notice that the pain was only in my left wrist and only in the center of my left palm. This focused my attention on my two middle fingers, especially the one on which I have been wearing a wedding ring pretty much non-stop since late 1985. (Of course, those prone to making a certain impolite hand gesture might have reason to suspect their middle finger.)

So I tried removing my wedding ring. I was unable to do so, even after soaking my hand for some minutes in a bath of water, soap, and ice. This situation seemed like a very bad thing, regardless of what might be causing the pain. I therefore consulted my wife, who suggested a particular jewelry store. Shortly thereafter, I was sitting in a chair while a gentleman used a tiny but effective hand-cranked circular saw to cut through the ring and a couple pairs of pliers to open it up. The gentleman was surprised that it took more than ten turns of the saw to cut through the ring, in contrast to the usual three turns. Apparently wearing a ring for more than 30 years can cause it to work harden.

The next step was for me to go without a ring for a few weeks to allow my finger to decide what size it wanted to be, now that it had a choice. They gave me back the cut-open ring, which I carried in my pocket. Coincidence or not, during that time, the pains in my wrists and palms vanished. Later, jewelry store resized the ring.

I now remove my ring every night. If you take up any sort of weight lifting involving use of your hands, I recommend that you also remove any rings you might wear, just to verify that you still can.

My second mistake was to embark upon a haphazard weight-lifting regime. I felt that this was OK because I wasn't training for anything other than advanced age, so that any imbalances should be fairly easily addressed.

My body had other ideas, especially in connection with the bout of allergy/asthma/sinitus/brochitis/whatever that I have (knock on wood) mostly recovered from. This condition of course results in coughing, in which the muscles surrounding your chest work together to push air out of your lungs as abruptly and quickly as humanly possible. (Interestingly enough, the maximum velocity of cough-driven air seems to be subject to great dispute, perhaps because it is highly variable and because there are so many different places you could measure it.)

The maximum-effort nature of a cough is just fine if your various chest muscles are reasonably evenly matched. Unfortunately, I had not concerned myself with the effects of my weight-lifting regime on my ability to cough, so I learned the hard way that the weaker muscles might object to this treatment, and make their objections known by going into spasms. Spasms involving one's back can be surprisingly difficult to pin down, but for me, otherwise nonsensical shooting pains involving the neck and head are often due to something in my back. I started some simple and gentle back exercises, and also indulged in Warner Brothers therapy, which involves sitting in an easy chair watching Warner Brothers cartoons, assisted by a heating pad lent by my wife.

In summary, if you are starting weight training, (1) take an organized approach and (2) remove any rings you are wearing at least once a week.

Other than that, have a very happy new year!!!

January 01, 2018 02:29 AM

December 30, 2017

Sri Ramkrishna

GNOME.Asia and Engagmeent update

I’ve been wanting to write a post on GNOME.Asia and the going ons with engagement for awhile, but never seemed to get the motivations to blog.  :)

GNOME.Asia was an amazing event and I wanted to reach out to the organizers and thank them for the wonderful reception that I received while I was there.  The trip to Chongqing was mostly uneventful other than the fact every Chinese official was gunning for my battery brick when going through airport security.  After a long layover in Beijing, I was landed in Chongqing and met up with Mathias Clasen and proceeded to head to the hotel.

Next day, we went on a wonderful trip to some caves in the local area that Lennart found in Lonely Planet.  We were very lucky to have Jonathan Kang with us to speak the local language as it would have been a challenging trip otherwise.  But we got to see some really interesting statues that were many centuries old.  There was one really especially interesting one that showed the Bodhisvatta with a thousand hands.  It definitely had a presence!  We came back in time to attend the reception although we were a little late.

I was lucky to have my talk on the first day which allowed me to not have to worry about my talk for the rest of the conference.  This was my first time going to a GNOME.Asia conference and everything was impressive.  First conference I’ve been to where there was a mini-drama with a fire-blower/fire-eater.  That definitely left an impression!

I gave my talk shortly after the intro, and it was well attended and I think people enjoyed it.  Most people know me that I tend to get a little energetic while on stage.

The rest of the conference, I enjoyed going to the english speaking talks, meeting with conference attendees, selfies, and everything else.  We had a day for BoFs and of course, we had an engagement one.  Well, Nuritzi and I had an engagement BoF.  :)  Apparently, writing code is still the sexy thing to do.  :-)

The conference did drive an impetus to harness the energy in Asia, and not just China, but India, Japan, S. Korea and so forth.  And after the conference, we started working in earnest to start organizing to bring in new members from Asia.

We had a lovely party on a ship, and a tour of Chongqing at night, that was really impressive.  Chongqing is really large, like one city the size of the Bay Area and possibly a larger population.  There was much fun to be had and of course more pictures and selfies and the like.

The next day was a walking tour of the city that our new friends took us around in the city.  The city reminds me a lot of Portland, simply because it was perpetually raining and foggy.  Which kept the pollution to a minimum.  The food was delicious and very spicy.  I’ve come to have a love/hate relationship with the szechuan pepper which while I like the spice, wasn’t overly fond of the numbness it causes.  Where in the cities on the west coast, the smell of cannibis shows up, so does the aroma of szechuan peppers in Chongqing!

I went shopping on the last day of my trip there and finally the next morning headed back to Denver.  Chinese security confiscated my power brick of which I was quite irate about.  I had that thing for 3 years, and I hated letting it go.  Of course as luck what have it, I needed it charged by the time I got out in Denver and had to spend an extra hour to charge my phone in order to go home. :(

Post conference, there has been a lot of re-organization to accommodate the Asian members of GNOME engagement.  We have moved to a new time and hopefully we can use some of amazing talent that some of our new members have in some of the engagement things.

Thanks to Carlos, we were able to also start using gitlab as a way to project manage social media and you’ll find that in the past 6 weeks that GNOME engagement social media are tracked in issues, and are getting completed.  The side effect is that work done by the engagement team are no longer opaque and instead the entire project can see what the team is doing.  Our engagement internally with the rest of the project has improved markedly.  We hope to continue making progress and improving the engagement team.  Our meetings are half discussions and have work sessions so that we remove items out of our todo.

There has never been a better time to get involved with GNOME engagement.  As a recent blog post by Christian Hergert has underscored, the project in order to grow needs to be able to have non-coding skills like project management, graphics artists, designers, and community managers.  We’re also a bit of a counter-culture group compared to the rest of the project.  So if you are interested in the people behind GNOME, the users of our software, or solving humanistic problems, come join us and let’s chat!

I would like to finally thank the GNOME Foundation for sponsoring my trip to GNOME.Asia.  I would not have been able to go otherwise.

sponsored by GNOME Foundation

by sri at December 30, 2017 09:15 PM

December 23, 2017

Paul E. McKenney

Book review: "Engineering Reminiscences" and "Tears of Stone"

I believe that Charles T. Porter's “Engineering Reminiscences“ was a gift from my grandfather, who was himself a machinist. Porter's most prominent contribution was the high-speed steam engine, that is to say, a steam engine operating at more than about 100 RPM. Although steam engines and their governors proved to be somewhat of a dead end, some of his dynamic balancing techniques are still in use.

Technology changes, people and organizations not so much. Chapter XVII starting on page 189 describes a demonstration of two of his new high-speed steam engines (on operating at 150 RPM the other at 300 RPM) along with one of his colleague's new boilers at the 1870 Fair of the American Institute in New York. The boiler ran slanted water tubes through the firebox to more efficiently separate steam from the remaining water. The engines were small by 1870s standards, one having 16-inch diameter cylinders with a 30-inch stroke and the other having 6-inch diameter cylinders with a 12-inch stroke.

Other exhibitors also had boilers and steam engines, and yet other exhibitors had equipment driven by steam engines. All the boilers and steam engines where connected, but given that steam engines were, then as now, considered to be way cooler than mere boilers, it should not be too surprising that the boilers could not produce enough steam to keep all the engines running. In fact, by the end of the day, the steam pressure had dropped by half, resulting in great consternation and annoyance all around. The finger of suspicion quickly pointed at Porter's two high-speed steam engines—after all, great speed clearly must imply equally great consumption of steam, right?

Porter had anticipated this situation, and had therefore installed a shutoff valve that isolated the boiler and his two high-speed steam engines from the rest of the Fair's equipment. Porter therefore closed his valve, with the result that the steam pressure within his little steam network immediately rose to 70 PSI and the pressure to the rest of the network dropped to 25 PSI. In fact, the boiler generated excess steam even at 70 PSI, so that the fireman had to leave the firebox door slightly open to artificially lower the boiler temperature.

The steam pressure to the rest of the fair continued to decrease until it was but 15 PSI. Over the noon hour, an additional boiler was installed, which brought the pressure up to 70 PSI. Restarting the steam engines of course reduced the pressure, but at 5PM it was still 25 PSI.

The superintendent of the machinery department had repeatedly asked Porter to reopen the valve, but each time Porter had refused. At 5PM, the superintendent made it clear that his request was now a demand, and that if Porter would not open the valve, the superintendent would open it for him. Porter finally agreed to open the valve, but only on the condition that the other managers of the institute verify that the boiler was in fact generating more than enough steam for both engines. These managers were summoned forthwith, and they agreed that the boiler had been producing most of the show's steam and that the pair of high-speed steam engines had been consuming very little. Porter opened the valve, and there was no further trouble with low-pressure steam.

It is all too easy to imagine a roughly similar story unfolding in today's world. ;–)

Porter went on to develop steam engines capable of running well in excess of 1,000 RPM, with one key challenge being convincing onlookers that the motion-blurred engine really was running that fast.

Interestingly enough, steam engines were Porter's third career. He was a lawyer for several years, but became disgusted with legal practice. At about that same time, he became quite interested in the problem of facing stone, that is, producing a machine that would take a rough-cut stone and give it a smooth planar face (smooth by the standards of the mid-1800s, anyway). After a couple of years of experimentation, he produced a steam-powered machine that efficiently faced stone. Unfortunately, at about that same time, others realized that saws could even more efficiently face stone, so his invention was what we might now call a technical success and a business failure.

Oddly enough, we have recently learned that the application of saws to stone was not an invention of the mid-1800s, but rather a re-invention of a technique used heavily in the ancient Roman Empire, and suspected of having been used as early as the 13th century BC. This is one of many interesting nuggets on life in the Roman Empire brought out by the historical novel “Tears of Stone” by Vannoy and Zeiglar. This novel is informed by Zeigler's application of Cold War remote-sensing technology to interesting areas of the Italian landscape, a fact that I had the privilege of learning directly from Zeigler himself.

On the other hand, perhaps Porter's ghost can console himself with the fact that the earliest stone saws were hand-powered, and those of the Roman Empire were water powered. Porter's stone-facing machine was instead powered by modern steam engines. Yes, the ancient Egyptians also made some use of steam power, but as far as we know they never applied it industrially, and never via a reciprocating engine driving a rotary shaft. And yes, all of the qualifiers in the preceding sentence are necessary.

As we learn more about ancient civilizations, it will be interesting to see what other “modern inventions” turn out to have deep roots in ancient times!

December 23, 2017 10:29 PM

October 02, 2017

Sri Ramkrishna

GUADEC – Engagement Going Ons

I just realized that I had not posted anything from GUADEC or talked about the Engagement BoF. Given the absence of any conversation on this, I thought I would post my thoughts. I am of course aware of the irony of the engagement team not communicating. :-) Onwards and onwards:

GUADEC 2017 was a fantastic this year and of course for me it is always meeting my friends, catch up with what people have been up to and so forth. Having run the gambit of conferences, GUADEC is refreshing because it is a pure community conference vs say Linux Foundation or some other event that isn’t singularly focused like this one is. Don’t get me wrong, those are fun and I have a different set of friends I enjoy meeting and talking with. But it is the unity of purpose and working together to create something.

After the core days, we had two days of BoF’s for the engagement team. This year, we focused on a number of initiatives.

Ubuntu Release
————–
We had extensive conversations on how to deal with Ubuntu migration to GNOME and the influx of people who may not be familiar with GNOME having coming from Unity.

The idea is to find a way to help with the migration and welcome to the new Ubuntu people.

Website
——-

We talked lot about the website and what we would like to see in a website refresh. In short, we want to focus more on community, not enough excitement generated, need to be more inclusive. Other things we want to do is focus on highlighting how to do donations.

Community Management
——————–

We aren’t really tracking how successful we are. We have no metrics, and that is something that needs to be formulated. We also need to analyze a lot of where are traffic is coming from and how to engage users who are not coming from Linux.

Newcomers
———

We want to start looking into creating newcomers guides not just for coders but for other areas, like internationalization, engagement, and other areas. We want to create an open space that people with any skillset can find a place within GNOME.

Kudos:

Want to thank everyone who worked on the Happy Birthday GNOME website. Huge thanks to Tom Tryfonidis who has taken up the large share of the website work in GNOME and deserves are deep and sincere thanks for his work. He has made so many things possible for us and all of us in the engagement team owe a debt of gratitude to him.

That’s it for now!

Also would like to sincerely thank the GNOME Foundation for sponsoring my trip to GUADEC of which without their help I would not be able to attend.

Sponsored by GNOME Foundation

by sri at October 02, 2017 01:34 AM

April 06, 2009

Darrick Wong

September 03, 2009

Valerie Aurora

Carbon METRIC BUTTLOAD print

I just read Charlie Stross's rant on reducing his household's carbon footprint. Summary: He and his wife can live a life of monastic discomfort, wearing moldy scratchy 10-year-old bamboo fiber jumpsuits and shivering in their flat - or, they can cut out one transatlantic flight per year and achieve the equivalent carbon footprint reduction.

I did a similar analysis back around 2007 or so and had the same result: I've got a relatively trim carbon footprint compared to your average first-worlder, except for the air travel that turns it into a bloated planet-eating monster too extreme to fall under the delicate term "footprint." Like Charlie, I am too practical, too technophilic, and too hopeful to accept that the only hope of saving the planet is to regress to third world living standards (fucking eco-ascetics!). I decided that I would only make changes that made my life better, not worse - e.g., living in a walkable urban center (downtown Portland, now SF). But the air travel was a stumper. I liked traveling, and flying around the world for conferences is a vital component of saving the world through open source. Isn't it? Isn't it?

Two things happened that made me re-evaluate my air travel philosophy. One, I started a file systems consulting business and didn't have a lot of spare cash to spend on fripperies. Two, I hurt my back and sitting became massively uncomfortable (still recovering from that one). So I cut down on the flying around the world to Linux conferences involuntarily.

You know what I discovered? I LOVE not flying around the world for Linux conferences. I love taking only a few flights a year. I love flying mostly in the same time zone (yay, West coast). I love having the energy to travel for fun because I'm not all dragged out by the conference circuit. I love hanging out with my friends who live in the same city instead of missing out on all the parties because I'm in fucking Venezuela instead.

Save the planet. Burn your frequent flyer card.

September 03, 2009 07:04 AM

March 04, 2013

Twitter

March 01, 2013

Twitter

February 18, 2009

Stephen Hemminger

Parallelizing netfilter

The Linux networking receive performance has been mostly single threaded until the advent of MSI-X and multiqueue receive hardware. Now with many cards, it is possible to be processing packets on multiple CPU's and cores at once. All this is great, and improves performance for the simple case.

But most users don't just use simple networking. They use useful features like netfilter to do firewalling, NAT, connection tracking and all other forms of wierd and wonderful things. The netfilter code has been tuned over the years, but there are still several hot locks in the receive path. Most of these are reader-writer locks which are actually the worst kind, much worse than a simple spin lock. The problem with locks on modern CPU's is that even for the uncontested case, a lock operation means a full-stop cache miss.

With the help of Eric Duzmet, Rick Jones, Martin Josefsson and others, it looks like there is a solution to most of these. I am excited to see how it all pans out but it could mean a big performance increase for any kind of netfilter packet intensive processing. Stay tuned.

by Linux Network Plumber (noreply@blogger.com) at February 18, 2009 05:51 AM

September 25, 2010

Andy Grover

Plumbers Down Under

<p>Since the original <a href="http://www.linuxplumbersconf.org/">Linux Plumbers Conference</a> drew much inspiration from <a href="http://lca2011.linux.org.au/">LCA</a>'s continuing success, it's cool to see some of what Plumbers has done be seen as <a href="http://airlied.livejournal.com/73491.html">worthy of emulating at next year's LCA</a>!</p><p>LCA seems like a great opportunity to specifically try to make progress on cross-project issues. It's quite well-attended so it's likely the people you need in the room to make a decision will be <em>in the room</em>.</p>

by andy.grover at September 25, 2010 01:50 PM

September 10, 2010

Andy Grover

Increasing office presence for remote workers

<p>I work from home. My basement, actually. I recently read an article in the Times about <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/05/science/05robots.html?_r=1&amp;pagewanted=1">increasing the office presence of remote employees with robots</a>. Pretty interesting. How much does one of those robo-Beltzners cost? $5k? This is a neat idea but it's still not released so who knows.<br /><br />I've been thinking about other options for establishing a stronger office presence for myself. Recently I bought a webcam. If I used this to broadcast me, sitting at my desk on Ustream or Livestream, that would certainly make it so my coworkers (and the rest of the world) could see what I was up to, every second of the workday. This is actually a lot <i>more</i> exposure than an office worker, even in a cubicle, would expect. If I'm in an office cube, I might have people stop by, but I'll know they're there, and they won't <i>always</i> be there.&nbsp; There is still generally solitude and privacy to concentrate on the code and be productive. I'm currently trying something that I think is closer to the balance of a real office:<br /><ul><li>Take snapshots from webcam every 15 minutes<br /></li><li>Only during normal working hours</li><li>Give 3 second audible warning before capturing</li><li>Upload to an intranet webserver</li></ul>I haven't found this to be too much of an imposition -- in fact, the quarter-hourly beeps are somewhat like a clock chime.<br /><br />In the beginning, it's hard to resist mugging for the camera, but that passes:<br /><img style="max-width: 800px;" src="http://oss.oracle.com/%7Eagrover/pics/blog/whassup.jpg" alt="whassup???" height="240" width="320" /><br />Think about how this is better than irc or IM, both of which <i>do</i> have activity/presence indicators, but which either aren't used, or poorly implemented and often wrong. How much more likely are you, as a colleague of mine, to IM, email, video chat, or call me if you can see I'm at my desk and working? No more "around?" messages needed. You could even see if I'm looking cheerful, or perhaps otherwise indisposed, heh heh:<br /><img style="max-width: 800px;" src="http://oss.oracle.com/%7Eagrover/pics/blog/cat1.jpg" alt="hello kitty" height="240" width="320" /><br />On a technical note, although there were many Debian packages that kind-of did what I wanted, it turned out to be surprisingly easy to roll my own in about <a href="http://github.com/agrover/pysnapper/blob/master/webcam.py">20 lines of Python</a>.<br /><img style="max-width: 800px;" src="http://oss.oracle.com/%7Eagrover/pics/blog/working.jpg" alt="working hard." height="240" width="320" /><br />Anyways, just something I've been playing around with, while I wait for my robo-avatar to be set up down at HQ...</p>

by andy.grover at September 10, 2010 05:20 PM

November 08, 2009

Valerie Aurora

Migrated to WordPress

My LiveJournal blog name - valhenson - was the last major holdover from my old name, Val Henson. I got a new Social Security card, passport, and driver's license with my new name several months ago, but migrating my blog? That's hard! Or something. I finally got around to moving to a brand-spanking-new blog at WordPress:

Valerie Aurora's blog

Update your RSS reader with the above if you still want to read my blog - I won't be republishing my posts to my new blog on this LiveJournal blog.

If you're aware of any other current instances of "Val Henson" or "Valerie Henson," let me know! I obviously can't change my name on historical documents, like research papers or interviews, but if it's vaguely real-time-ish, I'd like to update it.

One web page I'm going to keep as Val Henson for historical reasons is my Val Henson is a Man joke. Several of the pages on my web site were created after the fact as vehicles for amusing pictures or graphics I had lying around. In this case, my friend Dana Sibera created a pretty damn cool picture of me with a full beard and I had to do something with it.



It's doubly wild now that I have such short hair.

November 08, 2009 11:36 PM